chuck9941
Topic Author
Posts: 177
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2005 2:58 pm

For the Nikon users

Tue Dec 27, 2016 11:18 pm

The shutter on my D80 just went out after around 33k clicks. I had been thinking about upgrading from the 10 year old technology but now have more incentive to do so. At the time I was thinking making the jump to FF with the D750 and using the D80 as a backup but then of course along came the D500 to make things difficult. A quick google search shows I'm not alone...

I'm quite familiar with the comparison reviews on both but it still seems to be comparing apples to oranges with the only constant being they will both be a sizable upgrade form the D80. The appeal of the D750 is FF, DOF and low-light performance and for the D500 the FPS, AF and newest technology (for now). Crop factor is a given. I mostly shoot aviation followed by a mix of family, street and landscape.

Would be much appreciated to have the thoughts of those who shoot with each and preferably both. Not only for spotting but for general use as well. Thanks in advance.
Oh, it's a big pretty white plane with red stripes, curtains in the windows and wheels and it looks like a big Tylenol.
 
LeeYangzao
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2015 7:51 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Fri Dec 30, 2016 8:33 pm

I prefer D750.
The bigger a CMOS is, the better a camera is.
 
ThePointblank
Posts: 2654
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 11:39 pm

Re: For the Nikon users

Sat Dec 31, 2016 4:52 am

LeeYangzao wrote:
I prefer D750.
The bigger a CMOS is, the better a camera is.


Not really. What matters is the technology level inside the sensor, and the intended use for the camera.

For example, wildlife and sports photographers by far prefer crop sensor cameras, just for the extra reach a crop sensor camera can bring, especially if you intend or regularly crop your pictures in post processing. You will get more detail out of a crop sensor picture compared to a full frame camera in that scenario, if the lens is the same.

I would look at your workflow and check to see how you edit your photos in post processing. If you are finding that you are cropping your photos most of the time, stick with a crop sensor camera.
 
User avatar
jelpee
Crew
Posts: 304
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 1:34 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:17 pm

Nothing wrong with a crop sensor camera and for aviation, can give you that extra reach. I use a D800 as my primary body and a D7100 as my secondary body. Both are impressive. What makes the difference to me are the lenses. I can tell a world of difference when using the Nikon 70-200mm f2.8 VR vs. the Nikon 18-300mm on the D7100. On the D800, the Nikon 200-500mm f5.6 VR is a gem. The bigger sensor on a FF body will give you a better quality image especially if you crop as part of your post processing, but it depends on how much of a pixel peeper you are :). One item to consider is your current array of lenses. If you have DX lenses, stick with a crop sensor body (D7200 or the new D500) since when using a DX lens the image area will be limited on a FF body. Of course, if money is no object, then get a FF and a complement of non-DX lenses! Check out the Nikon 200-500mm...works well on a DX and a FX body.

Jehan
Airliners.net Crew - Photo Screener
 
flipdewaf
Posts: 1738
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 6:28 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Wed Jan 11, 2017 10:00 am

Pick each one up in the shop, have a fiddle through the settings, see how they feel. Feeling comfortable with the controls is the main thing for me and not being able to set the camera quick enough to get the shot you want will make you angry. Unless you are in very challenging conditions the only difference between pics will be the Exif data.

Fred
Image
 
User avatar
seahawk
Posts: 4320
Joined: Fri May 27, 2005 1:29 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:26 am

In the end it depends on how many of your lenses work with FF, how much effective reach you need and how much you have with your lenses on FX. Coming from a D80, I personally would look at a D7200. Much cheaper than the D750 or D500, still very capable and it leaves you money for at least one good lens to add to your collection. Or take the money and go on a nice vacation with your family instead, creating chances for many beautiful pictures. Imho if you are not making money with your camera, you do not need the FPS (unless you are only doing airshows and sports) of a D500 and you do not need the low ISO of a D750 (unless you only do no flash photography in dark rooms)

So I would suggest to go for a D7200 and find a good use for the money saved.

* I am shooting D800 and D7200 and have been shooting D300/D300S for years.
 
estorilm
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 3:07 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Fri Jan 13, 2017 2:25 pm

seahawk wrote:
In the end it depends on how many of your lenses work with FF, how much effective reach you need and how much you have with your lenses on FX. Coming from a D80, I personally would look at a D7200. Much cheaper than the D750 or D500, still very capable and it leaves you money for at least one good lens to add to your collection. Or take the money and go on a nice vacation with your family instead, creating chances for many beautiful pictures. Imho if you are not making money with your camera, you do not need the FPS (unless you are only doing airshows and sports) of a D500 and you do not need the low ISO of a D750 (unless you only do no flash photography in dark rooms)

So I would suggest to go for a D7200 and find a good use for the money saved.

* I am shooting D800 and D7200 and have been shooting D300/D300S for years.

+1 here, and a good post.

This is also coming from a (prior) D7200 user who now shoots with a D500. :)

The IQ out of the D7200 is simply outstanding, and honestly I haven't noticed much of a difference in high-ISO performance, though the edge would definitely have to be given to the D500 (in addition to higher dynamic range). For the sake of a.net usage, the larger resolution of the D7200 would probably also push me over the edge.

However, I shoot pro sports and photojournalism - coming up through D1, D200, D300 - then Nikon basically abandoned the market. I was forced to get the D7200 for sensor performance and increased low-light capability, BUT (what, 8 years after the D300?) I thought it would be a suitable replacement for the D300 (having no other choice) and boy was I wrong! Compared to the old D300, the 7200 felt light, cheap, slow, with lots of menu-lag - AF performance was almost identical, the viewfinder was annoying, and general ergonomics and handling suffered big time. Definitely NOT the D300 replacement I had hoped for.

Then a few weeks after I bought it, they announced the D500, of course - which I picked up on launch day. :)

Anyways, for this type of photography, I'd still aim for the D7200 - however for sports and anything fast-paced, important, sporting, or in harsh/nasty environments the D500 simply beats any crop sensor camera in the world. I'd also say that such specs and build should net you a camera that lasts about 10 years - while I wouldn't say the same for the D7200 (especially in that market, which is a little more competitive).

I would have kept both, but I was saving up for a used 200-400 f/4 which was worth every penny!

Too bad I don't live near an airport where I can do anything with all this equipment outside of sports / PR. IAD has got to be the WORST (best aircraft, worst location / constraints).
 
User avatar
cpd
Posts: 4847
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:46 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Sat Jan 14, 2017 10:44 pm

jelpee wrote:
Nothing wrong with a crop sensor camera and for aviation, can give you that extra reach.

Jehan


It's not really extra reach.

The million fps isn't so necessary, but good image quality and great low light performance is a great thing, so I'd recommend to go with the camera that is better in that regard.

If someone has many "DX" type lenses, then they are sort of stuck with those cameras, but they have predominantly "FX" type lenses, then go with the FX camera. If you need extra focal length, the 1.4x TC works well with the 70-200mm F/2.8, the 200-400mm F/4.0 and those prime lenses. I remember using the 200-400mm F/4.0 I purchased new with a D700 and 1.7x TC and was shocked at how good it was.

These days I still use the D3S and the D800e, both of them are still awesome. They only get used for sports photos now. I haven't upgraded the D3S yet, and don't intend to until I absolutely am forced to (when it no longer qualifies for NPS).
 
User avatar
seahawk
Posts: 4320
Joined: Fri May 27, 2005 1:29 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Sun Jan 15, 2017 10:29 am

There is a huge difference between sports and aviation. The distance to the subject is a lot different. If I shoot sports, even shooting across a whole soccer field, we are talking about 80-90m in the worst case. When you shoot aviation you are talking about the 300m and often more. At those distances the sensor performance is second to the atmospheric and weather conditions and in my experience it has always been the case that once I need to go over ISO640-800 the shots do not work out anyway, as haze, fog, rain or generally low contrast will kill the pic anyway. Yes FX still delivers a noise free shot but the photo will still be rejected at most sites and will still look like shit. And current DX sensors will do just fine up to ISO640/800. And imho in good light DX wins over using FX in crop mode and is equal to FX with a TC.
I would not recommend FX for aviation for 2 additional reasons:

1. shallow depth of field has no use. In fact you need to make certain that you step down enough so that the nose and tail are still sharp
2. weight, hand holding a D7200 + AF-S 70-300VR for a day is much easier than a D750 with the AF-S 80-400 VR. And under good light the images will be so similar that the paying double for the FX set-up is not worth it.

Example:

D800 + 80-400
http://www.jetphotos.net/photo/8476602

D7200 + 70-300
http://www.jetphotos.net/photo/8478700
 
User avatar
cpd
Posts: 4847
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:46 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Sun Jan 15, 2017 12:09 pm

On FX, you can happily use ISO1600 and F/2.8 to get a pretty nice, quite clean and bright shot at night without editing. If you apply editing, you should get a shot that should get onto these sites.

My favourite combination is the 70-200mm F/2.8 and the D800e and doing 1/4sec or so shutter speed hand held, using F/2.8 or F/3.5 at night. If you have an FX camera and F/2.8 lens, then go out and really push the limits with it at night around your local airport. You'll get pretty good at running the camera in manual mode too.

As for weight of the camera, I'm built like a stick insect and can still manage big heavy camera gear. If I can do that, then you guys should have no troubles. ;)
 
User avatar
seahawk
Posts: 4320
Joined: Fri May 27, 2005 1:29 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Sun Jan 15, 2017 12:16 pm

I think this is a very niche usage scenario. For this to make sense you need a suitable spotting location with suitable light conditions. I would not see this as a big reason to need FX.

Especially if you look at the price of D800/810 + 70-200VR, especially as for me 200mm is not enough. And to be honest I do not enjoy night shots with the D800 + 300mm 2.8 handheld that much. Yes, I can edit something useable out of it, but due to lights here at DUS, the shots are still not really stunning.
 
estorilm
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 3:07 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Wed Jan 18, 2017 9:47 pm

Wow - you all are talking about maxing out current DX Nikon offerings @ ~ISO 800, are you serious? Even for the sake of a.net - I find that laughable.

I've got shots that are selling from a local horse show in a dark indoor horse arena at 8000-12000 ISO out of my D500 at generous resolutions. Though some may not portray the IQ a.net requires, the noise is almost film-like and VERY desirable (if you've gotta have it.)

Still, 800 is a joke - I can shoot nearly-clean at 2000 ISO. If I shoot RAW (which I hate doing as a sports photographer lol) I'm sure I could go well beyond that. Ive got a beautiful portrait shot from the D7200 I had at 16,000 ISO!

FWIW the D500 (aka DX camera) is nearly-matching the best FX cameras on the market, and is only slightly below the D5 in DNR - beating the D4 and D800 etc in high-ISO performance. That's almost inconceivable for a DX camera - and to attain that "reach" along with the IQ is priceless for sports (and, I suppose - a.net type stuff!)
 
User avatar
yerbol
Crew
Posts: 286
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2010 1:18 am

Re: For the Nikon users

Tue Jan 24, 2017 7:33 pm

I would suggest to go for Nikon D750 mainly because of full frame sensor which gives you better clarity, better ISO, better DOF, better 3D dimension effect. Your photos will defenitely look better with a full frame camera.
With best regards from Almaty

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos