davidjohnson6
Topic Author
Posts: 118
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2016 10:10 pm

Exit row on very empty flights

Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:40 pm

A 737-800 has 4 emergency exit doors in the middle of the aircraft and therefore cabin crew at most airlines need at least 4 pax willing to sit next to those doors and agree to open the doors in an emergency

On seasonal leisure routes at the start and end of a season pax numbers are typically extremely low - almost nobody wants to leave the beach on the first flight back to the big city at the start of spring or go to the beach at the end of autumn when there is no corresponding flight a week earlier / later

If cabin crew have at least 4 pax but nobody agrees to sit in an emergency exit row, what is meant to happen ? Pax are told to follow crew orders or be offloaded, or some other solution ?
 
Cubsrule
Posts: 13261
Joined: Sat May 15, 2004 12:13 pm

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:44 pm

Should be a non-issue. A 738 with 4 passengers can pretty comfortably meet the evacuation time with no overwings used.
I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
 
jetmatt777
Posts: 3587
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 2:16 am

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:57 pm

I’ve been on many flights with no body at all occupying any of the 4 overwing exists.
Lighten up while you still can, don't even try to understand, just find a place to make your stand and take it easy
 
stlgph
Posts: 10606
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2004 4:19 pm

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sat Oct 27, 2018 11:12 pm

Hell, I've been on 3 flights where I was the only passenger on board.

Glad I made it!
if assumptions could fly, airliners.net would be the world's busiest airport
 
shamrock137
Posts: 289
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2005 7:10 am

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sat Oct 27, 2018 11:19 pm

davidjohnson6 wrote:
A 737-800 has 4 emergency exit doors in the middle of the aircraft and therefore cabin crew at most airlines need at least 4 pax willing to sit next to those doors and agree to open the doors in an emergency

On seasonal leisure routes at the start and end of a season pax numbers are typically extremely low - almost nobody wants to leave the beach on the first flight back to the big city at the start of spring or go to the beach at the end of autumn when there is no corresponding flight a week earlier / later

If cabin crew have at least 4 pax but nobody agrees to sit in an emergency exit row, what is meant to happen ? Pax are told to follow crew orders or be offloaded, or some other solution ?


In the US at least there is no requirement for the exit rows to be occupied. Especially with these being considered "premium" seats on most airlines, passengers will often use the "Well can you upgrade me for free? Its for safety!" but airlines and crews are usually happy to let the rows be empty if needed. Doesn't impact anything.
Time to spare? Go by air!
 
Wingtips56
Posts: 1069
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:26 am

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sun Oct 28, 2018 2:14 am

Back in the early 80's at AirCal, we had to do some serious load planning for the DC9-80s. We were usually overbooked at SMF, but for uncommon mid-capacity loads, we might have to block the last four rows. But for the rare light loads of <30 pax or so, we had to seat everyone in the first 11 rows (of 33/34) and all bags forward. They were configured F0 Y160/162 (later F0 Y150), so we didn't have upgrade issues. There was never any thought to putting anyone in the exit rows.
Later, with the AA S80, we did have a couple of times after long delays or odd tag flights after an inbound charter, we'd only have a handful of people that we did need to seat in F.

The OC 737-100/200 was almost impossible to screw up balance wise. (We just had to split the bag load fore/aft on the 733.) On the very rare light flights, we'd just suggest folks move forward just to cluster them so it was easier for our excellent flight attendants to serve. Again, filling exit row seats was never a thought.
Worked for WestAir, Apollo Airways, Desert Pacific, Western, AirCal and American Airlines (Retired). Flight Memory: 178 airports, 89 airlines, 71 a/c types, 397 routes, 56 countries (by air), 6 continents. 1,101,154 passenger miles.

Home airport : CEC
 
WayexTDI
Posts: 82
Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:38 pm

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sun Oct 28, 2018 2:19 am

davidjohnson6 wrote:
Pax are told to follow crew orders or be offloaded, or some other solution ?

While this is true, remember you are under no obligation to be seated in the exit row. If you are unable or unwilling to assist the crew in case of emergency, you can request to be reseated elsewhere and the crew will do so, no questions asked.
 
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vhtje
Posts: 848
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 12:40 pm

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sun Oct 28, 2018 5:56 am

Wingtips56 wrote:
Back in the early 80's at AirCal, we had to do some serious load planning for the DC9-80s. We were usually overbooked at SMF, but for uncommon mid-capacity loads, we might have to block the last four rows. But for the rare light loads of <30 pax or so, we had to seat everyone in the first 11 rows (of 33/34) and all bags forward. They were configured F0 Y160/162 (later F0 Y150), so we didn't have upgrade issues. There was never any thought to putting anyone in the exit rows.
Later, with the AA S80, we did have a couple of times after long delays or odd tag flights after an inbound charter, we'd only have a handful of people that we did need to seat in F.

The OC 737-100/200 was almost impossible to screw up balance wise. (We just had to split the bag load fore/aft on the 733.) On the very rare light flights, we'd just suggest folks move forward just to cluster them so it was easier for our excellent flight attendants to serve. Again, filling exit row seats was never a thought.


Excellent posts like these is what makes airliners.net. Thank you.
I only turn left when boarding aircraft. Well, mostly. All right, sometimes. OH OKAY - rarely.
 
n729pa
Posts: 1007
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:16 pm

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:49 pm

I flew LHR-PSA (Pisa) on a BA A321 one Sunday last year and there were only 8 of us on it. 1 in C 7 in Y. They asked me plus a guy with his teenage son across the aisle, if we'd move back to cover the emergency exits. Quite happy too and get a bit more leg room.
 
n729pa
Posts: 1007
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:16 pm

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:58 pm

I flew LHR-PSA (Pisa) on a BA A321 one Sunday last year and there were only 8 of us on it. 1 in C 7 in Y. They asked me plus a guy with his teenage son across the aisle, if we'd move back to cover the emergency exits. Quite happy too and get a bit more leg room.
 
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trpmb6
Posts: 1426
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:45 pm

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Tue Oct 30, 2018 4:43 pm

vhtje wrote:
Wingtips56 wrote:
Back in the early 80's at AirCal, we had to do some serious load planning for the DC9-80s. We were usually overbooked at SMF, but for uncommon mid-capacity loads, we might have to block the last four rows. But for the rare light loads of <30 pax or so, we had to seat everyone in the first 11 rows (of 33/34) and all bags forward. They were configured F0 Y160/162 (later F0 Y150), so we didn't have upgrade issues. There was never any thought to putting anyone in the exit rows.
Later, with the AA S80, we did have a couple of times after long delays or odd tag flights after an inbound charter, we'd only have a handful of people that we did need to seat in F.

The OC 737-100/200 was almost impossible to screw up balance wise. (We just had to split the bag load fore/aft on the 733.) On the very rare light flights, we'd just suggest folks move forward just to cluster them so it was easier for our excellent flight attendants to serve. Again, filling exit row seats was never a thought.


Excellent posts like these is what makes airliners.net. Thank you.


About 10 years ago I was on a light load flight from STL to MSP. Was on an ERJ-135. We had 5 pax including 1 who was connecting from IND that they didn't make deplane. The load coming in was fairly heavy, mostly full flight. We were instructed to sit however we wanted, but to try and stick towards the front end of the aircraft. To make matters worse, we were all traveling very light. So pretty much no baggage weight. They ended up adding sand bags to get weight and balance right. I was fascinated by it all and spent the time while they were loading the sand bags talking to the pilots about stability and control and weight and balance equations. I think they were mostly humoring me, but they seemed to enjoy the conversation.
 
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litz
Posts: 2183
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 6:01 am

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:26 pm

I had a very long delayed (due to MX) MD-88 flight from Melbourne FL, back to Atlanta once ... obviously, from the routing and aircraft type, this was DL.

4:30pm flight, we finally left about 1am after the part we needed was flown to Orlando, then driven to Melbourne (and installed).

By that point, the only people left were the 3 or 4 people who lived in Atlanta, and the crew ... everyone else was originating in FL and changing planes in ATL ... so they just bailed and went home, rescheduled for the following morning.

the plane itself had somewhere it was headed the following morning, so it was flying no matter what. The few of us who lived in ATL were happy to wait for it, and fly on it.

end of story, everyone sat up in first class, and we had most excellent service. The entire plane, aft of first class, was empty.
 
FrmrKSEngr
Posts: 407
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2014 6:05 am

Re: Exit row on very empty flights

Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:10 am

Since the thread has evolved to weight and balance, I have two stories.

First. Was traveling from Wichita to N. Ireland then on to Scotland with my wife. She was not comfortable with flying then (she has gotten better), so I thought it best not to discuss the Belfast to Glasgow flight before we left Wichita. As well as not being comfortable with flying, my wife does not know the meaning of packing light. So we had Excess baggag on the TATL flight (including a large wedding present fr my sister). So we were down one bag for out trip to Glasgow, but one was a big 50 pounder.

When we checked in at Aldergrove, we were informed that our big bag might not make the flight due to weight and balance. That is when my wife found out we were flying a Shorts 330 or 360 (don't remember which). She was not happy, and initially refused to fly on a small plane. She eventually calmed down and grudgingly got on the plane, and actually loved the flight. She liked being so low she could watch the countryside go by. We got to Glasgow, and out bag had made it as well.

Second was an ASA Banderentine flying from Wichita to DFW. Orignal flight to Cleveland was cancelled and delet screwed up the re-booking on UA to BDL. So we were able to get an AA flight out of DFW if DL/ASA could get us to DFW. We went back to the Delta counter and the agent called over the supervisor who looked Me, my wife and 2 yr old son (who had a ticket) up and down. It was 108 outside, and it hit me, this dude was assessing the weight impact on his almost full flight with hot conditions. If we had been three adults I doubt he would have put us on, but we made it and with us the plane was full. At least he did not ask us, especially my wife, to step on the scale.

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