IFlyVeryLittle
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Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2018 7:31 pm

The simplicity of aircraft tires

Wed May 30, 2018 2:32 pm

Compared to auto tires, the tread pattern on aircraft tires seem overly simple. Why didn't aircraft tires develop with more complex tread patterns?
 
amishfarmer
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 2:37 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Wed May 30, 2018 2:42 pm

It's not required. The primary concerns with aircraft tires is keeping contact with the surface and removing water, snow, etc out of the way. That's why the tread pattern is usually just a groove. Since they are needed as a source of friction for movement of the aircraft, straight channels is all they need.
 
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DocLightning
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Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Wed May 30, 2018 2:46 pm

I refer you to this thread. viewtopic.php?t=1335821
-Doc Lightning-

"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
-Carl Sagan
 
amishfarmer
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Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Wed May 30, 2018 8:34 pm

I meant to say NOT needed as a source of friction for movement.
 
WKTaylor
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2016 9:36 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:34 am

Tires operating on pavement simply don't need any thing but the simple tread noted... which simplifies tire construction/manufacturing/re-treading immensely.

Highs speed jet tires are invariably designed for pavement type surfaces. Several mechanical factors, other than simply displacing rain, slush, snow etc apply. Specifically these tires have very high inflation/operating pressures [250--400-PSIG] and are often designed to rotate at race-car speeds... +/-225-MPH. Tire stresses [especially landing] and high-speed balance factors... and to a lesser degree puncture/thrown-tread resistance... are improved/mitigated by the 'simple strap design'.... just like simplified ['slick'] race car tires.'

NOTE: fully inflated high performance aircraft tires have been called 'rubber bombs' due to the catastrophic way they fail at extreme high pressures and forces.

AERO Magazine - Exceeding Tire Speed Rating During Takeoff
Exceeding Tire Speed Rating During Takeoff
Airplane tires are designed to withstand a wide range of operating conditions, including carrying very high loads and operating at very high speeds. It is common for a jet airplane tire to carry loads as heavy as 60,000 pounds while operating at ground speeds up to 235 miles per hour. To accommodate these operational conditions, each tire has specific load and speed ratings. Tires are carefully designed and tested to withstand operation up to, but not necessarily beyond, these ratings

http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeroma ... _04_1.html
 
WKTaylor
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2016 9:36 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:36 am

Tires operating on pavement simply don't need any thing but the simple tread noted... which simplifies tire construction/manufacturing/re-treading immensely.

Highs speed jet tires are invariably designed for pavement type surfaces. Several mechanical factors, other than simply displacing rain, slush, snow etc apply. Specifically these tires have very high inflation/operating pressures [250--400-PSIG] and are often designed to rotate at race-car speeds... +/-225-MPH. Tire stresses [especially landing] and high-speed balance factors... and to a lesser degree puncture/thrown-tread resistance... are improved/mitigated by the 'simple strap design'.... just like simplified ['slick'] race car tires.'

NOTE: fully inflated high performance aircraft tires have been called 'rubber bombs' due to the catastrophic way they fail at extreme high pressures and forces.

AERO Magazine - Exceeding Tire Speed Rating During Takeoff
Exceeding Tire Speed Rating During Takeoff
Airplane tires are designed to withstand a wide range of operating conditions, including carrying very high loads and operating at very high speeds. It is common for a jet airplane tire to carry loads as heavy as 60,000 pounds while operating at ground speeds up to 235 miles per hour. To accommodate these operational conditions, each tire has specific load and speed ratings. Tires are carefully designed and tested to withstand operation up to, but not necessarily beyond, these ratings

http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeroma ... _04_1.html
 
strfyr51
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Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:24 am

IFlyVeryLittle wrote:
Compared to auto tires, the tread pattern on aircraft tires seem overly simple. Why didn't aircraft tires develop with more complex tread patterns?


There is NOTHING simple about an aircraft tire. you can get them from 12-24 Plies and from 12 Inch to 54 inches in diameter with Steel, Kevlar and Aramid Belts.
A Single main tire might cost what 2 sets of the most expensive racing tires might cost. The only thing simple? is the Tread Pattern.
 
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AirKevin
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Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:58 am

strfyr51 wrote:
IFlyVeryLittle wrote:
Compared to auto tires, the tread pattern on aircraft tires seem overly simple. Why didn't aircraft tires develop with more complex tread patterns?

There is NOTHING simple about an aircraft tire. you can get them from 12-24 Plies and from 12 Inch to 54 inches in diameter with Steel, Kevlar and Aramid Belts.
A Single main tire might cost what 2 sets of the most expensive racing tires might cost. The only thing simple? is the Tread Pattern.

And the post you quoted was asking about the simplicity of the tread on the tires, so I'm not sure where you're getting at here.
Captain Kevin
 
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767333ER
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Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:19 pm

With tires, the more rubber touching the ground, the better your traction will be. In perfect conditions, the best tire is one that has little to no tread such as a drag radial for drag racing. As well, the wear and tear a tire like this is put through and the speeds at which it would be operating at, more tread would make it less durable. Also considering the main use of the traction on these tires is for braking, actuall tread wouldn’t do much to help avoid hydroplaning over the simple grooves they have.
Been on: 732 733 734 73G 738 752 763 A319 A320 A321 CRJ CR7 CRA/CR9 E145 E175 E190 F28 MD-82 MD-83 C172R C172S P2006T
 
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CALTECH
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Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:12 am

IFlyVeryLittle wrote:
Compared to auto tires, the tread pattern on aircraft tires seem overly simple. Why didn't aircraft tires develop with more complex tread patterns?


They did back when.....

Image

Image

Image
The gun is a precious Symbol of Freedom
Criminals are the deadly cancer on American society
Those who believe otherwise are consumed by an ideology
That is impervious to evidence of tyrants who disarm their citizens
 
WIederling
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Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2015 2:15 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Sun Jun 10, 2018 12:15 pm

amishfarmer wrote:
I meant to say NOT needed as a source of friction for movement.


aircraft don't have brakes?
( SCNR )
Murphy is an optimist
 
dragon6172
Posts: 905
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:56 am

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:32 pm

CALTECH wrote:
IFlyVeryLittle wrote:
Compared to auto tires, the tread pattern on aircraft tires seem overly simple. Why didn't aircraft tires develop with more complex tread patterns?


They did back when.....

Image

Image

Image

A lot of grass and dirt strips back in the day
Phrogs Phorever
 
AbigailWT
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:23 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:39 pm

The primary purpose for any treading on tires is either water displacement (to prevent hydroplaning on pavement) or for grip (off-road).

Fortunately the vast majority of runways either aren't subject to standing water and/or are quickly remedied of the fact. You just don't find 16cm of standing water all over the place in controlled environments like runways to outweigh the benefit of a slick. This is the same reason why Tour de France racers also use bald tires even in the rain (another controlled environment).

Slick (without tread) tires offer vastly superior grip to their counterparts lacking in surface area.

Which brings in closing, the last use for treading, the parallel treading you see in almost every modern commercial airliner, without getting too technical, are merely wear indicators. Afraid a tyre engineer with get on here and expound upon the reasons for the parallel tread but hopefully they can agree it's not for grip :)

Best wishes all!
 
amishfarmer
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Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 2:37 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:30 pm

WIederling wrote:
amishfarmer wrote:
I meant to say NOT needed as a source of friction for movement.


aircraft don't have brakes?
( SCNR )


I was referring to the tires as a source of friction for forward acceleration. In other words the tires do not produce the force to move the aircraft forward.
 
WIederling
Posts: 6701
Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2015 2:15 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:19 am

amishfarmer wrote:
WIederling wrote:
amishfarmer wrote:
I meant to say NOT needed as a source of friction for movement.


aircraft don't have brakes?
( SCNR )


I was referring to the tires as a source of friction for forward acceleration. In other words the tires do not produce the force to move the aircraft forward.

There is no physical difference to rearward acceleration :-)
And acceleration during braking tends to be higher than in cruising while just compensating for losses.
Murphy is an optimist
 
strfyr51
Posts: 3016
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:04 pm

Re: The simplicity of aircraft tires

Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:21 am

IFlyVeryLittle wrote:
Compared to auto tires, the tread pattern on aircraft tires seem overly simple. Why didn't aircraft tires develop with more complex tread patterns?

Because they do NOT have to corner!

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