bruh
Topic Author
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:18 pm

Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:07 pm

Hello,
would like to know if the take-off RVR approved for an aircraft type also applies to the landing RVR required.
I.e. if there is a RVR/075 for instance in the remark section, will this be the RVR that applies for both landing and take-off?

Thanks in advance
 
Woodreau
Posts: 1498
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:44 am

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:25 pm

Just like for landing minimums It depends on the airline and airport/runway.

Different airlines and different airports are certified for different minimums.

My airline is certified to land with 300RVR and take off with 500RVR if the airport supports it.
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Adispatcher
Posts: 99
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2016 11:52 pm

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:55 pm

Depends on what's charted and if required equipment is working on the runway you will be using, but the mins are not always the same.

Woodreau answered it.
 
atcdan
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2017 6:52 am

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Tue Jan 09, 2018 11:59 pm

Also keep in mind that in most towers the RVR updates and is issued to pilots in real-time. I've had it before where the RVR dropped while a plane was mid-approach and they ended up going missed at about 1/2 mile because the RVR was allowing for cat III only and they were not capable.
 
CosmicCruiser
Posts: 2132
Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2005 3:01 am

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:11 am

the answer is no. they are 2 separate mins. as someone posted your mins both t/o and ldg are airline dependent.
 
greg85
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 9:45 am

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:29 am

For takeoff, it's 125 RVR. For approved operators only. You need a greater RVR for takeoff than you do for landing. Again, this is airfield specific. Some places require higher RVRs.
 
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zeke
Posts: 11661
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:00 pm

125 m RVR (Category A, B and C) or 150 m RVR (Category D), and use 75 m for landing.
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Whiteguy
Posts: 1213
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2003 6:11 am

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:43 pm

atcdan wrote:
Also keep in mind that in most towers the RVR updates and is issued to pilots in real-time. I've had it before where the RVR dropped while a plane was mid-approach and they ended up going missed at about 1/2 mile because the RVR was allowing for cat III only and they were not capable.


Depends when you receive the report, if you’re inside the FAF you can continue the approach to minimums.
 
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zeke
Posts: 11661
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:45 pm

There is no FAF on an ILS approach
Human rights lawyers are "ambulance chasers of the very worst kind.'" - Sky News
 
CosmicCruiser
Posts: 2132
Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2005 3:01 am

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:16 pm

correct zeke. our policy was that if it were a CATIII app that anytime from feather g/s intercept on any drop in RVR below CATIII mins was a missed approach. Just our policy
 
greg85
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 9:45 am

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Thu Jan 11, 2018 1:52 pm

zeke wrote:
There is no FAF on an ILS approach


However, many airlines do use 1000ft as the equivalent point. For the purposes of what was described above, at my airline if the RVR went below required after we passed the FAF equivalent point (1000ft) then we would continue to minimums.
 
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zeke
Posts: 11661
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

Re: Take-Off/Landing RVR equivalent?

Thu Jan 11, 2018 2:01 pm

greg85 wrote:
However, many airlines do use 1000ft as the equivalent point. For the purposes of what was described above, at my airline if the RVR went below required after we passed the FAF equivalent point (1000ft) then we would continue to minimums.


ILS approaches have a FAP, final approach point which is a distance either defined by a marker or DME and the glide slope. That point remains the same in space regardless of QNH or temperature.

The 1000 ft point is known as the approach ban point. You cannot continue a LVO approach below 1000 ft if the RVR drops below the minimum required, if below 1000 ft you can continue to the minimum.

Different things for different purposes.
Human rights lawyers are "ambulance chasers of the very worst kind.'" - Sky News

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