CDreier
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Posts: 71
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 6:34 am

B777-232LR Range Question

Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:48 am

Delta flies the 77L from KATL-FAOR (JNB) and return with a typical flight time of 15+ hours and a distance of approximately 8450 miles. I'm assuming the normal payload is close to normal. Obviously this is a routine flight. But this is where I'm confused - doesn't a trip of this length place the aircraft close to operational limits in terms of fuel, weight, etc.? I know the 77L's in airline use aren't using the aux tanks. Thanks.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 305
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: B777-232LR Range Question

Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:56 am

Well, lots of flights are at the operational limits for the airframe; not an issue. If it's out of limits, they stop to fix the limiting factor, usually to add fuel.

GF
 
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LAX772LR
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Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 11:06 pm

Re: B777-232LR Range Question

Mon Aug 14, 2017 8:59 am

CDreier wrote:
I know the 77L's in airline use aren't using the aux tanks. Thanks.

AI and EK both took the internal provisions for 1 additional belly tank on their birds.

The aircraft that EY gained from AI have them too.
Pretty sure EK and EY don't operate with any of the tanks actually installed though.

No airline ordered 77Ls with provisions for all 3 available tanks though.
I myself, suspect a more prosaic motive... ~Thranduil
 
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Starlionblue
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Re: B777-232LR Range Question

Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:20 am

CDreier wrote:
Delta flies the 77L from KATL-FAOR (JNB) and return with a typical flight time of 15+ hours and a distance of approximately 8450 miles. I'm assuming the normal payload is close to normal. Obviously this is a routine flight. But this is where I'm confused - doesn't a trip of this length place the aircraft close to operational limits in terms of fuel, weight, etc.? I know the 77L's in airline use aren't using the aux tanks. Thanks.


As long as you're not exceeding the limits, then you're good to go. Of course higher weights put more strain on the engines, landing gear and so on, but that's just cost. It's not like there is really more risk at 90% of the limits compared to 80%.

In the end it's about being able to carry enough fuel and having the performance for take-off at the weight. The plane is certified to the maximum, so taking off at MTOW is operationally the same as taking off 10 tons below MTOW.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo

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