xaviergak
Topic Author
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:45 am

Aircraft Documentation

Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:57 am

Good morning,

I would like to know which is the most important documentation for a pilot and an aircraft, apart from the Airworthiness, (M)MEL, and POH.

I've also found that the Flight Operations Manual includes the FCOM, QRH and SOP, is that true?

And finally, I don't know if there is any relation between the FCOM and the AOM, or if they are similar documents.

Thank you!
 
BravoOne
Posts: 2104
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 2:27 pm

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Wed Mar 08, 2017 11:28 am

you have your titles all twix'd up. The titles vary from manufacture to operator.
FCOM (Boeing) Flight Crew Operating Manual
QRH (Boeing) Quick Reference Handbook Think; Non Normal checklist, Normal checklist, Performance, Non Normal Maneuvers
SOP Standard Operating Procedures (Boeing cover that in the FCOM)
AOM Aircraft Operating Manual??
MMEL Master Minimum Equipment List (FAA approved MEL used to created the airlines MEL)
DDG Dispatch Deviation Guide is used to support the operators MEL
Many more but these are the ones the typical pilot would use
 
BravoOne
Posts: 2104
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 2:27 pm

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Wed Mar 08, 2017 11:28 am

You have your titles all twix'd up. The titles vary from manufacture to operator.
FCOM (Boeing) Flight Crew Operating Manual
QRH (Boeing) Quick Reference Handbook Think; Non Normal checklist, Normal checklist, Performance, Non Normal Maneuvers
SOP Standard Operating Procedures (Boeing cover that in the FCOM)
AOM Aircraft Operating Manual??
MMEL Master Minimum Equipment List (FAA approved MEL used to created the airlines MEL)
DDG Dispatch Deviation Guide is used to support the operators MEL
Many more but these are the ones the typical pilot would use
 
xaviergak
Topic Author
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:45 am

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Wed Mar 08, 2017 12:20 pm

Thank you for your answer. I am also interested in the relation between documents:

What's exactly the Aircraft Operating Manual ? Is it equivalent to the FCOM?

And what about the Flight Operations Manual? Does it include all the documents I've mentioned above, or they are totally different documents?
 
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zeke
Posts: 11058
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Wed Mar 08, 2017 12:36 pm

Certificate of registration, certificate of airworthiness, the technical log or maintenance release however it is defined in the local regulations, licences and medical certificates of the operating crew, flight manual (this maybe substituted by the Flight Crew Operating Manual/ Aircraft Operating Manual), radio licence, the names, places of embarkation and places of destination of the passengers, bills of lading and manifests with respect to the cargo. Current charts and maps.

AOM/FCOM same same
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Calder
Posts: 151
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2015 1:34 pm

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Wed Mar 08, 2017 1:25 pm

From the prospective of the lowly private pilot, the handy mnemonic is A.R.R.O.W.

A - Airworthiness Certificate
R - Registration
R - Radio Operators License (if flying internationally)
O - Operating handbook (POH)
W - Valid weight & balance
C. T.
 
Woodreau
Posts: 1366
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:44 am

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Wed Mar 08, 2017 6:52 pm

In my limited 3 airline experience, an AOM is an airline specific tailored manual.

For example, the Airbus AFM contains all the normal, abnormal, emergency procedures and limitations for operating an Airbus aircraft, say an A320.
The airline will take the Airbus manuals, and write a tailored AOM for the procedures the airline will use to operate it's A320s.

At my airline, the AOM only contains normal procedures. It separates out the abnormal (gen overload), emergency (engine fire / cabin fire) and supplemental (cross bleed engine start / deicing) procedures into a separate manual - QRM.
My airline also has an FOM, but instead of containing aircraft specific operating procedures - it just specifies general operating procedures that is applicable across all fleet types at the airline, like weight and balance, or diversion planning, dispatch, security, flight crew responsibilities and qualifications.

So the Airbus AFM is available, but not the primary reference for operating the aircraft - the AOM and FOM are the primary reference.

Another example is when picking up a new aircraft from the manufacturer. At my airline we have an approved weight and balance program that is used to ensure the aircraft is operated within weight and balance limits. But when picking up a new aircraft from the manufacturer, the aircraft has not been accepted into the airline's weight and balance program yet. So we have to revert to private pilot weight and balance, weight x arm = moment, and add all of it up and determine a %CG, and look up in the manufacturer's manuals (and not our airline's procedures manuals) the appropriate trim setting. After ferrying the aircraft from the manufacturer to our airline's maintenance base, the aircraft is imported and inducted into our airline's maintenance program, and weighed to be accepted into our weight and balance program, and then added onto our airline opspecs. After which all of our normal procedures specified in our airline manuals (AOM/FOM/QRM/fueling manual/deicing manual/station operating manuals) can be used.

Another example: In the US, American, United, and Delta all operate the 737 and 320 aircraft. But the way American operates the 320 or 737 is different from the way Delta operates their 320 or 737. All the airlines have access to the Boeing FCOM for the 737 and Airbus AFM for the 320. but American will write their procedures for the 737/320 in an AOM-1/2 FM-1. where as Delta has their 737/320 procedures contained in their OM Vol 1/OM Vol 2/QRH/FOM
Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
 
xaviergak
Topic Author
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:45 am

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Thu Mar 09, 2017 1:40 pm

Thanks for spending your time writing the answer!

However, following your explanation, FCOm is the same as AFM, but it is different from the AOM (which is defined by the airline and it is based in the corresponding FCOM/AFM), isn't it?

And by the way, the MEL is a totally different document? It seems logic to me to put it into the AOM or AFM, am I wrong?
 
Woodreau
Posts: 1366
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 6:44 am

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:43 pm

The MEL is a different document - it has nothing to do with the operation of the aircraft, just what is allowed to be inoperative and still be allowed to dispatch.
Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
 
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zeke
Posts: 11058
Joined: Thu Dec 14, 2006 1:42 pm

Re: Aircraft Documentation

Thu Mar 09, 2017 4:51 pm

No the AFM is a very short document, basically the limits and emergency procedure.

FCOM is a very much expanded AFM, contain supplemental information and supplemental procedures.

Most airlines vary the manufacturers documtation but it costs a lot of money to do so, as that is one of the ways manufacturers keep earning money after an airframe is sold.
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