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LAXintl
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DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:44 am

After lingering nearly 19 months, the US DOT on Friday quietly issued Norwegian Air UK Limited its tentative foreign air carrier permit.

DOT says it found Norwegian Air UK is fit, willing and able properly to perform the foreign air transportation and carrier is in compliance and controlled in a manner consistent with the provisions of the U.S.-EU Open-Skies Agreement.

DOT found arguments made by Norwegian UK’s opponents were essentially the same as those made previously against Norwegian Air International (NAI) and the “The Department has already thoroughly considered, and rejected these arguments. We tentatively see no persuasive basis on the record of the present proceeding to reach a different conclusion here."

The tentative order becomes permanent in 21-days barring new objections.

OST-2015-0261

=

It's interesting to note that only a week ago the EC transport director warned that the EC would once more turn to arbitration if the Norwegian UK application was not approved soon, while the UK government also went on the record a few weeks ago questioning the ongoing delay.
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TerminalD
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:55 am

The same thread was posted last night and deleted. Not sure why it was deleted completely.

It used to be here: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1368363
 
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mercure1
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:01 am

The needles US politics around Norwegian is so confusing.

In this case Norwegian UK is as much a UK airline as is BA, Virgin Atlantic, Jet2com, Monarch, etc.

As came out during the Norwegian Irish application, so long as European authorities certify the carrier and deem it valid including its ownership, the US must accept this. The same manner the Europeans accept the regulatory authority and oversight abilities they have of US carriers.
 
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LAXintl
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:48 am

It's purely needless foot dragging.

DOT well knows there is no legal ground to reject the application but in the face of the insistent lobbying the file keeps getting moved to the bottom of the pile.
Only when the EU and UK finally threaten action does the decision mysteriously appear.
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commavia
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:55 pm

LAXintl wrote:
DOT well knows there is no legal ground to reject the application but in the face of the insistent lobbying the file keeps getting moved to the bottom of the pile.


:checkmark:

There was never any plausible legal basis on which the U.S. was going to deny this application. I fully understand why the unions are worried about the threat that Norwegian poses to them - and, indeed, I think they're quite right to be worried. And of course the unions were obviously fully within their rights to exert political pressure to that end. But ultimately, nothing Norwegian was doing was inconsistent with EU law, nor with the plain text reading of the Open Skies agreement.
 
cyberual
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Mon Jul 17, 2017 6:49 pm

now that the Norwegian UK has been approved, will we see more expansion in the US?
 
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reidar76
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:03 pm

cyberual wrote:
now that the Norwegian UK has been approved, will we see more expansion in the US?


There will definitely be more US expansion, but I can't see that this approval is an opener for more US expansion.

The main reason to have an UK AOC is to take advantage of UK specific bilateral agreements. UK airlines, as Norwegian Air UK, benefit from good agreements with countries belonging to the British Commonwealth, for example Canada, Singapore, India/Pakistan, Australia, South Africa etc.

Norwegian can fly with any of their AOCs to the US, so I think this US approval of Norwegian Air UK has something to do with aircraft utilization and good departure/arrival hours in different time zones. For example flying from Singapore to London, and then use the same plane and crew pool to continue to the US.
 
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:31 pm

cyberual wrote:
now that the Norwegian UK has been approved, will we see more expansion in the US?


The UK bi-laterals are much more useful than that of the EU/Norway agreements for operating to as many countries as they plan on, hence this will mean that they can offer far more in terms of destinations now with this. You can expect NAS to be folded into NUK or have the employees and aircraft transferred over which will allow much more flexibility. Previously NAS crew based in UK/US would be able to work across the Atlantic between the US/EU/UK but then unable to work a flight on NUK to SIN/EZE. Transfering the crew/aircraft to NUK will allow improved utilization of both lowering costs.

That being said, to answer your question, the US/EU/UK market is quite large, while there is room for expansion to more US destinations, you'll probably only see a handful more to the US in the near future. It's likely Norwegian has continued the US growth waiting for this approval. Now that it's been accepted they can start expanding to other places where they can use Gatwick as a destination but also as a connection point. I would venture a guess as to places like India, South Africa, and Asia as their next announcements.

Norwegian has been doing a lot of focus work with US airports as an interim solution waiting for the NUK application, which can also mean finishing those projects off and announcing them. The other option they may do is more "connecting the dots" between 787 cities allowing for better operational flow and utilization of aircraft like was announced with CDG-OAK/BOS.

You'll see a large focus on 737Max ops in the US, as well as some interesting additions to routes that before weren't possible. 737Max will really be a game changer.
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Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sat Sep 23, 2017 10:55 am

Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

http://www.newsweb.no/newsweb/search.do ... eId=435306

Press release from the Oslo Stock Exchange:

" Norwegian has welcomed news that its British subsidiary 'Norwegian UK' (NUK) has been granted a
foreign air carrier permit by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The permit allows NUK to
operate flights between the UK, Europe and the United States, effective immediately.

The 'Norwegian UK' (NUK) subsidiary was set up in 2015 to allow Norwegian to build on its growing
long-haul operationsby accessing bilateral traffic rights to a series of global markets. Using the new
traffic rights, Norwegian has already announced plans for new routes to Singapore launching in
September and Argentina starting in February 2018.

With a U.S. foreign carrier permit also now received for NUK, Norwegian will be able to establish a
seamless operation and more effectively utilise its long-haul fleet - this includes the use of the same
aircraft across all long-haulroutes includingthe U.S., Singapore, Argentina and other future long-haul
markets. Norwegian already employs more than 1,000 pilots and crew at London Gatwick, and the
airline's continued UK growth will lead to thousands more jobs and economic benefits.

Norwegian CEO Bjørn Kjos said: "This is great news for Norwegian and passengers on both sides of
the Atlantic, enabling us to offer even more new routes, greater choice and lower fares. Our Norwegian
UK subsidiary has already opened the door to a range of new markets, so securing access to the U.S is
the final piece of the jigsaw, allowing us to operate a seamless operation with affordable fares to a
range of global destinations.

"New routes will also lead to more jobs, and along with the 1,000 pilots and crew already working for us
at London Gatwick, we look forward to creating thousands more jobs and economic benefits as we
continue to grow.We would like to thank the many airports, airlines, businesses and politicians on both
sides of the Atlantic for supporting for NUK and the huge benefits of Open Skies and fair competition."

Work will now begin to establish which elements of Norwegian's existing long-haul operations (including
new and existing routes, aircraft and crew) will be operated by the NUK subsidiary in future. "
 
oslmgm
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 1:41 am

Will this give them permission to fly over Russia? Or what are the new benefits for Norwegian?
 
FA9295
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 2:03 am

oslmgm wrote:
Will this give them permission to fly over Russia? Or what are the new benefits for Norwegian?

IDK about Russia, but the main benifit woild be that Norwegian will be able to open/add a ton of more new routes to and from the U.S. and Europe. Even though, I personally think that Norwegian has way more then enough routes already established...
 
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PatrickZ80
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:12 am

It has nothing to do with Russia, but like said already it gives them permission to expand in America.

The purpose of this UK registration is to keep rights to fly in and from the UK after the Brexit. As it is now Britain is still part of the EU, so a British registration will give them rights anywhere in Europe and a European registration gives them rights anywhere in Britain. After the Brexit this is no longer the case, but now that Norwegian has both they can fly to the USA from both the UK and the EU.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:16 am

oslmgm wrote:
Will this give them permission to fly over Russia? Or what are the new benefits for Norwegian?


How do you equate a permission by the US DoT with permissions to overfly Russia? Or, put it another way, if Russia relinquished its overflight restrictions for Scandinavian carriers, would Scandinavian carriers be free to fly to the US as and when they pleased?
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Andy33
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:43 am

PatrickZ80 wrote:
It has nothing to do with Russia, but like said already it gives them permission to expand in America.

The purpose of this UK registration is to keep rights to fly in and from the UK after the Brexit. As it is now Britain is still part of the EU, so a British registration will give them rights anywhere in Europe and a European registration gives them rights anywhere in Britain. After the Brexit this is no longer the case, but now that Norwegian has both they can fly to the USA from both the UK and the EU.


The UK AOC also allows them to fly to all sorts of places worldwide from the UK (such as Singapore and Argentina which are mentioned in the press release) where traffic rights have always been governed by bilaterals and not by EU-wide treaties. The UK project started long before Brexit appeared and while it will certainly allow Norwegian to maintain UK-US flights, it wasn't why they applied for a UK AOC to begin with, and the AOC was granted in November 2015, nearly a year before the UK held its referendum.
 
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reidar76
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:59 am

The purpose of the UK AOC and the subsidiary "Norwegian Air UK" is:

1) Securing rights after BREXIT
When the UK leaves the EU in March 2019, the UK carrier, Norwegian Air UK, can continue to fly from the UK to destinations all over the world. Norwegian Air International (the Irish subsidiary) can after March 2019 only fly to/from the UK-EU and EU-the rest of the world, not UK-the rest of the world.

2) Taping into UK only flying rights
There are bilateral agreements between the UK and countries under British rule or countries belonging to the British Commonwealth. Queen Elisabeth is head of state of Canada, Australia, New Zeeland, Singapore and many more countries. India, South-Africa, Hong Kong and many more countries belongs to the Commonwealth/ the British Colonials. As a British carrier, "Norwegian Air UK", can tap into to the rights to operate flights between these countries and the UK.

3) Aircraft utilization, flying Asia <-> UK <-> US
Norwegian can operate as many flights it wants between any European city and the US. The only reason why it was important to also get US approval for "Norwegian Air UK", is because of aircraft utilization. For example this new approval means that the same aircraft (and same crew pool) that fly between Singapore and London, can also the used to, for example, flying between London and New York.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:13 am

Does this allow them to fly BDA-USA?
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:17 am

Andy33 wrote:

The UK AOC also allows them to fly to all sorts of places worldwide from the UK (such as Singapore and Argentina which are mentioned in the press release) where traffic rights have always been governed by bilaterals and not by EU-wide treaties. The UK project started long before Brexit appeared and while it will certainly allow Norwegian to maintain UK-US flights, it wasn't why they applied for a UK AOC to begin with, and the AOC was granted in November 2015, nearly a year before the UK held its referendum.


Hmm since 2002, EU aviation agreements has been governed by EU law and no new agreements are permissible should they not fulfill the requirements of EU legislation (among the conditions is horizontal agreements). So where changes are made to any bilateral, the EU clause needs to be inserted.
This has meant that changes have been introduced gradually and today many of the leading markets have completely bypassed national bilaterals with EU member states and instead have a EU aviation agreement.

Singapore for example signed such in 2006. Since it include a full horizontal aviation agreement Norwegian could, should it apply using any EU AOC, be granted flights from anywhere in the EU to Singapore. A horizontal agreement is an international agreement negotiated by the Commission on behalf of EU Member States, in order to bring all existing bilateral air services agreements between EU Member States and a given third country in line with EU law. With Norwegian being from an EFTA member this might have caused some issues as we have seen with their US flights where the Irish license was not deemed satisfactory at first.
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:23 am

PVD757 wrote:
Does this allow them to fly BDA-USA?


Unlikely, since Bermuda is not a part of the EU and therefore not covered by the EU/US OpenSkies agreement. The French West Indies is a part of the EU, and therefore Norwegian can operate flights between these islands and the US. Norwegian Air UK can operate UK-Bermuda.

Bermuda is British overseas territory, and a part of the British Empire. Bermuda is not a part of the UK nor the EU.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:28 am

reidar76 wrote:
The purpose of the UK AOC and the subsidiary "Norwegian Air UK" is:

1) Securing rights after BREXIT
When the UK leaves the EU in March 2019, the UK carrier, Norwegian Air UK, can continue to fly from the UK to destinations all over the world. Norwegian Air International (the Irish subsidiary) can after March 2019 only fly to/from the UK-EU and EU-the rest of the world, not UK-the rest of the world.

Nobody knows what the Brexit solution for aviation will be. The UK government don't even seem to know what they want, or if they do, they aren't telling anyone.
It is quite likely that the UK will remain in the European Common Aviation Area, but then again maybe it won't. In theory, though incredibly unlikely, there could be no flights at all between the UK and the EU, or between the UK and countries where traffic rights are governed by EU treaties. Things don't just revert to how they were before the UK joined the EU as the previous bilateral treaties were formally cancelled.
And Brexit most certainly isn't the reason why Norwegian originally wanted the UK AOC, because it was applied for and issued long before the Brexit referendum happened.
2) Taping into UK only flying rights
There are bilateral agreements between the UK and countries under British rule or countries belonging to the British Commonwealth. Queen Elisabeth is head of state of Canada, Australia, New Zeeland, Singapore and many more countries. India, South-Africa, Hong Kong and many more countries belongs to the Commonwealth/ the British Colonials. As a British carrier, "Norwegian Air UK", can tap into to the rights to operate flights between these countries and the UK.

The UK has bilateral air service agreements with almost every country in the world (where these haven't been superseded by all-EU agreements), and of course most countries have never been under British rule or members of the British Commonwealth. You're over-stating the Commonwealth point - and the President of Singapore would be most surprised to find he isn't his country's head of state.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:59 am

B777LRF wrote:
oslmgm wrote:
Will this give them permission to fly over Russia? Or what are the new benefits for Norwegian?


How do you equate a permission by the US DoT with permissions to overfly Russia? Or, put it another way, if Russia relinquished its overflight restrictions for Scandinavian carriers, would Scandinavian carriers be free to fly to the US as and when they pleased?

I should have phrased my question differently - I didn't mean to ask if the US DoT approval would give them permission to over-fly Russia. What I'm wondering is this:
Is it easier for Norwegian Air UK to get Russian approval, compared to their other subsidiaries based in Norway/Ireland? If so, they could start routes to Japan, China etc., combined with flights to the US (fleet utilization like reidar76 described).
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:09 am

oslmgm wrote:
B777LRF wrote:
oslmgm wrote:
Will this give them permission to fly over Russia? Or what are the new benefits for Norwegian?


How do you equate a permission by the US DoT with permissions to overfly Russia? Or, put it another way, if Russia relinquished its overflight restrictions for Scandinavian carriers, would Scandinavian carriers be free to fly to the US as and when they pleased?

I should have phrased my question differently - I didn't mean to ask if the US DoT approval would give them permission to over-fly Russia. What I'm wondering is this:
Is it easier for Norwegian Air UK to get Russian approval, compared to their other subsidiaries based in Norway/Ireland? If so, they could start routes to Japan, China etc., combined with flights to the US (fleet utilization like reidar76 described).


No, it's not easier nor is it more difficult. It just doesn't make any difference.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:56 am

reidar76 wrote:
PVD757 wrote:
Does this allow them to fly BDA-USA?


Unlikely, since Bermuda is not a part of the EU and therefore not covered by the EU/US OpenSkies agreement. The French West Indies is a part of the EU, and therefore Norwegian can operate flights between these islands and the US. Norwegian Air UK can operate UK-Bermuda.

Bermuda is British overseas territory, and a part of the British Empire. Bermuda is not a part of the UK nor the EU.


There is no such thing as the British Empire today. The French have overseas territories, we don't call it a French Empire so therefore calling Bermuda part of the British Empire is not correct.
 
olle
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 10:37 am

In 2019 how will norvegian solve ownership rules? Will uk allow non uk ownership over 49%?
 
Andy33
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 10:40 am

olle wrote:
In 2019 how will norvegian solve ownership rules? Will uk allow non uk ownership ower 49%

Nobody knows. If the UK government has any idea at all, again, they're not saying. It may well be they haven't even realised they need to make a decision.
 
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Mortyman
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 10:46 am

The original plan of launching Norwegian Air UK was to fly between Britain and Asia and Africa ( I don't know if it has changed ). But here are som info from old articles on the subject:


Norwegian, the low-cost airline, hopes to begin flights from Britain to Asia, South America and South Africa after being granted a UK Operating License.

It will launch a subsidiary, Norwegian UK, early next year, enabling it to take advantage of Britain’s bilateral air traffic agreements with countries around the world.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/news/ ... h-America/

Also something that no doubt has to do With Norwegian Air UK / Article from 2015 ):

The Sunday Times writes Monday that Norwegian is believed to be behind the company Westforce Aviation, which allegedly intends to avoid problems with the company's transatlantic expansion.
Communications director Anne-Sissel Skånvik in Norwegian, however, announces to TDN Finance on Monday that Westforce Aviation is a part of Norway's growth in the UK and has nothing to do with the United States.


"UK and Gatwick is where Norwegian is growing most and we are planning many new routes to, for example, South Africa and Asia. India is one example where we need access to bilateral agreements. So this is just a part of that work, it has nothing to do with the United States. To and from the United States it is Open Skies, "writes Skånvik in an email to TDN Finans.



In January ( 2015 ), Westforce Aviation applied to the United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authorities for a license to fly charter and scheduled traffic, according to the Sunday Times.
"It's just a temporary company set up by a law firm working with facilitation. It is not a company in the Norwegian structure, "Skånvik states.



Translated from:

https://www.dn.no/nyheter/naringsliv/20 ... -til-india



Skånvik reports that the British company is not to be used against the United States.
She says that in 2017, Norwegian will receave new and larger Dreamliners with a long range, and that it may be appropriate to start routes between Britain and countries in Asia and Africa.
- Then a EU license (as Irish NAI will come under, red.anm.) is not enough. Then we have to fly on bilateral agreements and then we need a British license, "she says.


Industrial sources told the Sunday Times that the company can integrate the entire business, thus gaining access to the agreed terms negotiated between British and American aviation


http://e24.no/boers-og-finans/norwegian ... k/23410941
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 1:15 pm

FA9295 wrote:
oslmgm wrote:
Will this give them permission to fly over Russia? Or what are the new benefits for Norwegian?

IDK about Russia, but the main benifit woild be that Norwegian will be able to open/add a ton of more new routes to and from the U.S. and Europe. Even though, I personally think that Norwegian has way more then enough routes already established...


This is not correct. Norwegian already has unlimited access to the U.S through Open Skies. Norway is already a part of the U.S – EU Open skies agreement, and there is no limits in the number of routes they can fly to the U.S.

But Norway is not an EU member, and the reason why they wanted an Irish and British AOC is that gives them permission to fly to more places in Asia, South-America and Africa. The reason they also wanted their Irish and British companies to get permission from the U.S is so that they can fly the same plane from the U.S to continue to Asia and Africa. Right now they need to swap planes because the lack of permissions. Norwegian initially wanted more flying to Asia, but the U.S hesitation to grant permission for their Irish and British companies have actually given an increased operation to the U.S.
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 2:40 pm

"There is no such thing as the British Empire today. The French have overseas territories, we don't call it a French Empire so therefore calling Bermuda part of the British Empire is not correct."


Perhaps "Parliamentary dependency under constitutional monarchy" is more correct - remembering that Bermuda issues its own passport rather than using UK's.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 3:13 pm

Mortyman wrote:
The original plan of launching Norwegian Air UK was to fly between Britain and Asia and Africa ( I don't know if it has changed ).

I don't think so. Norwegian UK was established in November 2015 and applied for the US foreign air carrier permit on 11 December 2015, which means that the planning and paperwork for the permit application would have preceeded the November 2015 establishment.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 3:46 pm

gunnerman wrote:
Mortyman wrote:
The original plan of launching Norwegian Air UK was to fly between Britain and Asia and Africa ( I don't know if it has changed ).

I don't think so. Norwegian UK was established in November 2015 and applied for the US foreign air carrier permit on 11 December 2015, which means that the planning and paperwork for the permit application would have preceeded the November 2015 establishment.



and your point is ?
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 3:57 pm

Mortyman wrote:
gunnerman wrote:
Mortyman wrote:
The original plan of launching Norwegian Air UK was to fly between Britain and Asia and Africa ( I don't know if it has changed ).

I don't think so. Norwegian UK was established in November 2015 and applied for the US foreign air carrier permit on 11 December 2015, which means that the planning and paperwork for the permit application would have preceeded the November 2015 establishment.



and your point is ?

I am assisting your lack of understanding.
 
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PatrickZ80
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 4:55 pm

kgaiflyer wrote:
"There is no such thing as the British Empire today. The French have overseas territories, we don't call it a French Empire so therefore calling Bermuda part of the British Empire is not correct."


Perhaps "Parliamentary dependency under constitutional monarchy" is more correct - remembering that Bermuda issues its own passport rather than using UK's.


Officially they're called British Overseas Territories.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Overseas_Territories

In short this is everything British that isn't England, Wales, Scotland or Ireland. This even includes the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, although they're close to Britain they don't have the same status.

Norwegian could fly to Bermuda from Britain on their British AOC, but they can't fly there from America unless they got 5th freedom rights (which they don't have). To fly out of Bermuda other than that they need a Bermudian AOC, a British AOC isn't valid in Bermuda other than for flights to Britain.
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 5:01 pm

So the G- B789s will no longer fly under the "NorShuttle" callsign?
 
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mercure1
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 5:02 pm

US DOT approved Norwegian UK back in July.

DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits
viewtopic.php?t=1368415
 
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SQ22
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Sep 24, 2017 5:16 pm

I have merged the new thread into the old one. Enjoy your discussion.
 
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Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Sep 24, 2017 5:57 pm

SQ22 wrote:
I have merged the new thread into the old one. Enjoy your discussion.


Just to be Clear. The one back in July was just tentative apporval. The one yesterday was final approval.
 
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Mortyman
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 5:59 pm

gunnerman wrote:
Mortyman wrote:
gunnerman wrote:
I don't think so. Norwegian UK was established in November 2015 and applied for the US foreign air carrier permit on 11 December 2015, which means that the planning and paperwork for the permit application would have preceeded the November 2015 establishment.



and your point is ?

I am assisting your lack of understanding.



I simply answered the question wich many are asking, wich is why they need this Norwegian Air UK and what bthey are gonna use it for. It is not for flying to the US
 
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Re: Norwegian's UK subsidiary given final approval by U.S. Department of Transportation for transatlantic operations

Sun Sep 24, 2017 6:01 pm

PatrickZ80 wrote:

In short this is everything British that isn't England, Wales, Scotland or Ireland..

Ireland isn't British.
 
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kgaiflyer
Posts: 2701
Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2008 3:22 am

Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:35 pm

"Ireland isn't British."

But Northern Ireland is British.

I'm sure that's what ThrottleHold meant.
 
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kgaiflyer
Posts: 2701
Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2008 3:22 am

Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:40 pm

"Officially they're called British Overseas Territories".

Point taken (since Wikipedia is *never* wrong).

Except . . . when you issue your own passport - as Bermuda does - you're *more* than just an overseas territory.
 
Jayafe
Posts: 598
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2017 3:12 pm

Re: DOT Approves Norwegian Air UK permits

Mon Sep 25, 2017 2:27 pm

kgaiflyer wrote:
"Ireland isn't British."

But Northern Ireland is British.

I'm sure that's what ThrottleHold meant.


But Northern Ireland isn´t Ireland, and Ireland is what he wrote....

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