Airstud
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Posts: 4108
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Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 3:34 am

...is it safe to toss them into the woods?

I always figure anything is better then contributing to the landfills, so when I... um... found a couple of oranges that I bought more than a month ago, and therefore won't be eating, I planned to chuck them into the woods and let them biodegrade.

But might there then be a risk of them being eaten by local wildlife whose tummies can't handle all the acid in them? :boggled:
Pancakes are delicious.
 
seb146
Posts: 18053
Joined: Wed Dec 01, 1999 7:19 am

Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 4:22 am

There is also the amount of water and sunlight. Some plants demand direct sunlight at all times, others do well with little or no sunlight. Some plants to do well with little water, others demand water all the time. I would not worry much about animals eating the rotting fruit. The seeds will probably not do much at all, other than fertilize the surrounding plants.
You bet I'm pumped!!! I just had a green tea!!!
 
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bgm
Posts: 1718
Joined: Fri Sep 11, 2009 9:37 am

Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 4:35 am

Airstud wrote:
...is it safe to toss them into the woods?

I always figure anything is better then contributing to the landfills, so when I... um... found a couple of oranges that I bought more than a month ago, and therefore won't be eating, I planned to chuck them into the woods and let them biodegrade.

But might there then be a risk of them being eaten by local wildlife whose tummies can't handle all the acid in them? :boggled:


Here's a novel idea: composting.
https://www.epa.gov/recycle/composting-home
When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front row seat. - George Carlin
 
Airstud
Topic Author
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Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 5:06 am

seb146 wrote:
There is also the amount of water and sunlight. Some plants demand direct sunlight at all times, others do well with little or no sunlight. Some plants to do well with little water, others demand water all the time. I would not worry much about animals eating the rotting fruit. The seeds will probably not do much at all, other than fertilize the surrounding plants.


See, not trying to grow oranges in Minnesota; just trying to do what's best for the planet in terms of waste management, without endangering local critters' digestive health.
Pancakes are delicious.
 
seb146
Posts: 18053
Joined: Wed Dec 01, 1999 7:19 am

Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 5:20 am

Airstud wrote:
seb146 wrote:
There is also the amount of water and sunlight. Some plants demand direct sunlight at all times, others do well with little or no sunlight. Some plants to do well with little water, others demand water all the time. I would not worry much about animals eating the rotting fruit. The seeds will probably not do much at all, other than fertilize the surrounding plants.


See, not trying to grow oranges in Minnesota; just trying to do what's best for the planet in terms of waste management, without endangering local critters' digestive health.


I used to throw my apple cores at the base of trees. I never heard of any problems with that. I should have thought that a form of cyanide is in apple seeds and they can be harmful to animals.
You bet I'm pumped!!! I just had a green tea!!!
 
Airstud
Topic Author
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Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 7:29 am

seb146 wrote:
Airstud wrote:
seb146 wrote:
There is also the amount of water and sunlight. Some plants demand direct sunlight at all times, others do well with little or no sunlight. Some plants to do well with little water, others demand water all the time. I would not worry much about animals eating the rotting fruit. The seeds will probably not do much at all, other than fertilize the surrounding plants.


See, not trying to grow oranges in Minnesota; just trying to do what's best for the planet in terms of waste management, without endangering local critters' digestive health.


I used to throw my apple cores at the base of trees. I never heard of any problems with that. I should have thought that a form of cyanide is in apple seeds and they can be harmful to animals.


This is in Oregon? Where apple trees grow naturally, yes?

Basically my question is about biodegradation of organic matter within an ecosystem well outside of its native one.
Pancakes are delicious.
 
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Jouhou
Posts: 1017
Joined: Tue May 24, 2016 4:16 am

Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 7:57 am

seb146 wrote:
Airstud wrote:
seb146 wrote:
There is also the amount of water and sunlight. Some plants demand direct sunlight at all times, others do well with little or no sunlight. Some plants to do well with little water, others demand water all the time. I would not worry much about animals eating the rotting fruit. The seeds will probably not do much at all, other than fertilize the surrounding plants.


See, not trying to grow oranges in Minnesota; just trying to do what's best for the planet in terms of waste management, without endangering local critters' digestive health.


I used to throw my apple cores at the base of trees. I never heard of any problems with that. I should have thought that a form of cyanide is in apple seeds and they can be harmful to animals.



Wait till you find out about peach pits...

Fun fact: cyanide smells like almonds
 
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fr8mech
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Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 8:36 am

The internet is your friend:

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-p ... nts/orange

Realistically, you wouldn't be adding too much to a landfill. An orange peel takes about 6 months to decompose. I guess it may take a little longer in a landfill, but I wouldn't sweat it too much. It's not like it's a diaper or straw.
When seconds count...the authorities are minutes away.
Unless it's expressly prohibited, it's allowed.
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casinterest
Posts: 6969
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 5:30 am

Re: Where oranges don't grow...

Wed May 16, 2018 11:51 am

Airstud wrote:
...is it safe to toss them into the woods?

I always figure anything is better then contributing to the landfills, so when I... um... found a couple of oranges that I bought more than a month ago, and therefore won't be eating, I planned to chuck them into the woods and let them biodegrade.

But might there then be a risk of them being eaten by local wildlife whose tummies can't handle all the acid in them? :boggled:


Chuck em into the woods. Deep. Ants and bugs will love them. Perhaps a larger animal will take a look.
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