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einsteinboricua
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Mispronounced Words

Sun Oct 22, 2017 11:20 pm

How come certain segments of the population thrive on purposely mispronouncing words? I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice".

The Grammar Nazi in me is alive and well and I am tempted to correct them on the spot; others have done so and the coworker insists it's a "hood" way of pronouncing things.

It's one thing when someone says po-TAE-toe and another says po-TAH-toe. It's a regional difference of the same word. Even teeter-totter and see-saw refer to the same thing (depending on where you grew up). Sneakers-tennis shoes; water fountain-drinking fountain...they all mean the same thing. However, no one ever mispronounces these words. You'll never hear someone say sneak-ERS or sneak-res.

Nuclear and nucular are borderline, though even Bill Clinton said the same way which leads us to believe it's the Southern accent (doesn't make it any more acceptable).

In Spanish, it gets complicated even further. We have La Real Academia Española (The Royal Spanish Academy) who is supposed to be the ultimate authority as to what constitutes good Spanish grammar and vocabulary. I was disappointed when they accepted a variant of the word "bat". In Spanish it's 'murciélago' (moor-see-EH-lah-go) yet they went ahead and said that 'murciégalo' (moor-see-EH-gah-loh) is acceptable.

I understand languages evolve, but if we have words for something, why do we allow them to become bastardized into something else? Ask->aks, for example...And for the record, I don't proclaim myself to be an expert in language, but (IMO) it speaks volumes that a non-native speaker has better command of the language than a sizeable part of the native speaker population.

On a side note, I'd love to post this on my cube, but I fear HR may give me a call:
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NoTime
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sun Oct 22, 2017 11:55 pm

einsteinboricua wrote:
How come certain segments of the population thrive on purposely mispronouncing words? I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice".


Careful... some folks around here will brand you a racist just for pointing out proper grammar.

"Supposedly" is one, of many, that drive me crazy. People love to pronounce it "suposebly".

And, while not entirely related, it also kills me to see/hear people use "I could care less"
 
71Zulu
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 12:41 am

For all intensive purposes ... that one always cracks me up.


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BartSimpson
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:32 am

einsteinboricua wrote:
... I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice"....


How can you even pronounce that word "aksking"? I'm twisting my tongue when I try it.

My pet peeve with the German language is that 90 % of the people don't understand the difference between "anscheinend" ("apparently") and "scheinbar" ("seemingly"). The difference in English may not be that big, but in German these words are almost opposites:

- "anscheinend": The window is anscheinend open - means: The window may be open or not, it's not clear.
- "scheinbar": The window is scheinbar open - means: The window looks as if it were open, but it is definitely closed.

Most people use "scheinbar" every time because it is easier to pronounce, I guess.
 
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einsteinboricua
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 10:52 am

BartSimpson wrote:
einsteinboricua wrote:
... I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice"....


How can you even pronounce that word "aksking"? I'm twisting my tongue when I try it.

ax-king
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salttee
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 11:19 am

Some people see language as a dead thing which should never change, they fight a never ending battle against change.
Other people see language as a living thing, which is sure to evolve.

Guess who wins in the end.
 
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 12:55 pm

salttee wrote:
Some people see language as a dead thing which should never change, they fight a never ending battle against change.
Other people see language as a living thing, which is sure to evolve.

Guess who wins in the end.

There's evolution that makes sense, and then there is evolution that makes not the slightest bit of sense... like how "irregardless" has become a valid word. That is evolution that is just plain dumb.
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tommy1808
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 2:19 pm

cjg225 wrote:
There's evolution that makes sense, and then there is evolution that makes not the slightest bit of sense... like how "irregardless" has become a valid word. That is evolution that is just plain dumb.


if it doesn´t make sense, it won´t spread..... if it does spread, it makes sense. At least in the sense of being appealing to brains.

best regards
Thomas
NIKV69 wrote:
The race is over. Moore has over 50% of the vote with just about half the votes in. Jones can't overcome that. McConnell has 10am meeting tomorrow so they can get this guy removed. At least the seat stays Republican. That is the important thing.
:D
 
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 2:56 pm

I'm always puzzled as to why some, what would seem to be well-educated people, refer to "archeries" when they mean "arteries"
 
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cjg225
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 3:21 pm

tommy1808 wrote:
if it doesn´t make sense, it won´t spread..... if it does spread, it makes sense. At least in the sense of being appealing to brains.

best regards
Thomas

It doesn't make sense. That's the point. It is a classic double-negative.
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cledaybuck
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 3:45 pm

Some people seem to have trouble pronouncing the phrase "big league."
 
tommy1808
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 4:13 pm

cjg225 wrote:
tommy1808 wrote:
if it doesn´t make sense, it won´t spread..... if it does spread, it makes sense. At least in the sense of being appealing to brains.

best regards
Thomas

It doesn't make sense. That's the point. It is a classic double-negative.


I would think that Bob Marley, Cheryl Cole,
The Bloodhound Gang, Faithless, the
Rolling Stones and Pink Floyd would disagree.

Joke asside, the classic double negative is only classic in English. In classic German it ain't (in modern German it is, we survived the transition), in French it ain't and in Russia pretty much any negative is a double negative.

What makes "sense" in ones mind language wise mostly depends on what language you grow up with. It does for example still puzzle me, that in the English language a minute change, let's say by just one minute can have large effect. What I am trying to say, who the hell thought it would make sense to have the same spelling for minute and minute? I understand how both meanings came to be, but why hasn't the spelling diverged?

Best regards
Thomas
NIKV69 wrote:
The race is over. Moore has over 50% of the vote with just about half the votes in. Jones can't overcome that. McConnell has 10am meeting tomorrow so they can get this guy removed. At least the seat stays Republican. That is the important thing.
:D
 
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 4:28 pm

einsteinboricua wrote:
How come certain segments of the population thrive on purposely mispronouncing words? I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice".

I really think it's just a Black cultural/vernacular thing, particularly for Black people from the South. I also know highly educated Black people who say "aks."
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stlgph
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 4:35 pm

Matenance.
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einsteinboricua
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:41 pm

OA412 wrote:
einsteinboricua wrote:
How come certain segments of the population thrive on purposely mispronouncing words? I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice".

I really think it's just a Black cultural/vernacular thing, particularly for Black people from the South. I also know highly educated Black people who say "aks."

The problem is that this coworker likes to blame it as being part of the "hood", except when you associate them with the "hood" they immediately are insulted.

I understand if you grew up in a culture where "ask" is pronounced "aks". But to say "it's the hood way" while having nothing to do with it is a contradiction. It's like me correcting your grammar, but then asking for a pass on mine because I'm not a native speaker.
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VapourTrails
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:36 am

"pacific" ..for specific.

:biggrin:


I've heard these in Australia too. :down:

stlgph wrote:
Matenance.


NoTime wrote:
"Supposedly" is one, of many, that drive me crazy. People love to pronounce it "suposebly".


..and the "aks" or "aksed" one as well. :mischievous:


IMHO people are listening more than reading (nowadays) and this could contribute to the mispronounced words also.

I can across engVid.com on YouTube and wow there is so much I missed out on when I learnt my only spoken language, English. Things we use in practice, but have a whole meaning or their own, like - participles, idioms and phrasal verbs, subjunctives... :faint:
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FTMCPIUS
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 5:09 pm

"ree-lator" for realtor

"jew-lury" for jewelry

"vee-hickal" for vehicle
 
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cjg225
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 6:37 pm

FTMCPIUS wrote:
"ree-lator" for realtor

Do you mean "REE-lah-tor?" I'm trying to figure out what you're saying it sounds like because "lator" is two syllables.
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DarkSnowyNight
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 6:55 pm

einsteinboricua wrote:
How come certain segments of the population thrive on purposely mispronouncing words? I have a coworker (with a masters, no less) who wants to know if I've "aksed" someone about a subject and insists that I can learn more by "aksking" while also letting me know about a ticket from the "poelice".

The Grammar Nazi in me is alive and well and I am tempted to correct them on the spot; others have done so and the coworker insists it's a "hood" way of pronouncing things.


It's become an accent. While the phrase "There's a winner" generally isn't the first thing that jumps to mind when I hear it, a lot of accents fall into that category. Southern accents, West Country/North Country accents, Australian accents and a whole bag of others seem to have the same effect.

einsteinboricua wrote:
Nuclear and nucular are borderline, though even Bill Clinton said the same way which leads us to believe it's the Southern accent (doesn't make it any more acceptable).


Where's the borderline component? One's the valid pronunciation and the other is literally not a word. Unless someone's managed to discover this legendary Nuculeus somewhere?

einsteinboricua wrote:
And for the record, I don't proclaim myself to be an expert in language, but (IMO) it speaks volumes that a non-native speaker has better command of the language than a sizeable part of the native speaker population.


Nope, doesn't illustrate anything at all, although I'll give you that it's a common misconception to believe otherwise. Plenty of good reasons why things are the way they are...

notime wrote:
"Supposedly" is one, of many, that drive me crazy. People love to pronounce it "suposebly".


Fub. I like to use that one ironically around folks that have the same issue with it. I should probably cut that out...


Notime wrote:
And, while not entirely related, it also kills me to see/hear people use "I could care less"


Used to bother me too. Now that I know why it's said that way, not so much.

cjg225 wrote:
There's evolution that makes sense, and then there is evolution that makes not the slightest bit of sense... like how "irregardless" has become a valid word. That is evolution that is just plain dumb.


That pretentious, dirty slut will never be a word in my universe!

If I know someone uses that one on a regular basis, I will literally (as in not the figurative sort of literal), go out of my way to say "without regard to" when the need for that one comes up.


einsteinboricua wrote:
The problem is that this coworker likes to blame it as being part of the "hood", except when you associate them with the "hood" they immediately are insulted.

I understand if you grew up in a culture where "ask" is pronounced "aks". But to say "it's the hood way" while having nothing to do with it is a contradiction. It's like me correcting your grammar, but then asking for a pass on mine because I'm not a native speaker.


How is that a contradiction? I don't like where I came either, but I'm not about to take on a new accent/vernacular to draw even more attention to the issue. While they could probably stand be somewhat less sensitive about it, they're not wrong either. Blame =/= proud of.
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727LOVER
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 6:57 pm

People using wrong words


their / there / they're
too / to / two
your / you're


It always cracks me up, when I see protest signs like these:

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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 7:01 pm

FTMCPIUS wrote:
"vee-hickal" for vehicle

That probably stems from the pronunciation of vehicular.
 
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 7:10 pm

cjg225 wrote:
FTMCPIUS wrote:
"ree-lator" for realtor

Do you mean "REE-lah-tor?" I'm trying to figure out what you're saying it sounds like because "lator" is two syllables.

You're correct. The way they say it is three syllables.
 
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Tugger
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 8:27 pm

My grouse is always with "Been"... I do not no how anyone ever thought pronouncing it "Bin" was the right way but it is now in the dictionary as being pronounced that way. Two e's in a row are a "long E" folks. Sadly I have lost this one though I always pronounce it (incorrectly apparently) with the long Eeee... sound (and most everyone notices it).

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Re: Mispronounced Words

Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:40 pm

salttee wrote:
Some people see language as a dead thing which should never change, they fight a never ending battle against change.
Other people see language as a living thing, which is sure to evolve.

Guess who wins in the end.

At the current pace, the next dictionaries will be full of emojis.
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cjg225
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:24 am

TWA772LR wrote:
At the current pace, the next dictionaries will be full of emojis.

I haven't heard of it yet, but I assume eventually some college professors will allow emojis in college papers since some of them allow text-speak in papers.
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bunumuring
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:53 pm

Hey guys,
I confess to being a grammar Fanatic as well...
And encounter daily mispronounced words by people in all walks of life.
My dear late grandmother used to always pronounce 'films' as 'fill-ems' which I loved....
My dear mother cracks me up when she refers to McDonalds 'McCafes' as 'Mc-Cathys/-Kathys' (as in the girl's name)....
Then we get arguably the most famous mispronunciation in Sydney's history (where I was born and raised) .... 'and the winner is, Syder-knee' by Juan Antonio Samaranch, in 1993 announcing that Sydney was chosen to host the Year 2000 Olympics....
Honourable mention must go to New Order, for deliberately mispronouncing the name of their home country as 'Enger-land' in the song 'World In Motion'....
Cheers,
Bunumuring
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luckyone
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:01 pm

Two that drive me up the wall:
How the word "washer" becomes "warsher."
"Water" becomes "wooder."

People who cannot seem to conjugate verbs properly: Ie. "you was" "I/you/he/she/we/they/ya'll BE"

My roommate in college hails from deep South Georgia, while I grew up in yuppie metro Atlanta. We obviously had very different accepts and manners of speaking. One particular difference was the word "envelope." I typically pronounce the word "AHN-ve-LOPE," whereas he pronounced the word "in-velup," as if it were spelled "envelop," a different word. I cannot tell how many times I attempted to tell him he was using the pronunciation of the word in its form as a verb to describe a noun. Needless to say I did not have much success. Another was "pecan." I had always heard the word pronounced "puh-cahn," with the stress on the second syllable, while he pronounced it "pee-can," like a can of Coke. I'll accept "pe-can" but nothing in the spelling of that word indicates a long E.

They're/their/there is not mispronunciation considering THEY'RE homophones--using the three words inappropriately is just sheer ignorance and laziness.

More amusing than anything else: the word DeKalb. I've lived in Georgia (DeKalb County) and Illinois (where it's a city). They're pronounced differently. Same with Vienna (Austria and Georgia respectively)

Show the town Dahlonega to a group of ten people. Perhaps half will pronounce it as locals do.

Another favorite: In the song "My Heart Will Go One," while the last verse of the chorus is "my heart will go on and on," Dion sings "My heart will go ond and onnnnn"
 
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einsteinboricua
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:44 pm

luckyone wrote:
Dion sings "My heart will go ond and onnnnn"

It sounds like this part is "onan onnnn"...if you've studied poetry (it's structure), poets took great liberties to unite syllables so that a line in a verse consisted of "x" syllables.

A haiku is a perfect example. If you were to use the word "brilliant", it can be pronounced as "brill-ee-ant" or "brill-yant". Depending on the pronunciation, it fits the haiku or it'll have a surplus/one less syllable.
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Polot
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:45 pm

luckyone wrote:
Another was "pecan." I had always heard the word pronounced "puh-cahn," with the stress on the second syllable, while he pronounced it "pee-can," like a can of Coke. I'll accept "pe-can" but nothing in the spelling of that word indicates a long E.

Both pronunciations are accepted (and many people put the stress on completely different syllables both ways). You also see "pee-cahn" and occasionally "puh-can". Nothing in spelling of the word "pecan" suggests the correct pronunciation is "puh-cahn" instead of "pee-can" so that is probably the worst justification for your pronunciation over another that you could give...

One form is not always correct over another in regional variations of pronunciations.

luckyone wrote:
Another favorite: In the song "My Heart Will Go One," while the last verse of the chorus is "my heart will go on and on," Dion sings "My heart will go ond and onnnnn"

I mean extending/dragging out a word in music, especially at the end of a song/verse/chorus, to better match the melody is pretty common....
Last edited by Polot on Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
luckyone
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Oct 25, 2017 5:23 pm

Polot wrote:
Both pronunciations are accepted (and many people put the stress on completely different syllables both ways). You also see "pee-cahn" and occasionally "puh-can". Nothing in spelling of the word "pecan" suggests the correct pronunciation is "puh-cahn" instead of "pee-can" so that is probably the worst justification for your pronunciation over another that you could give...

Well aside from the fact that you included my own pronunciation in varieties heard, I acknowledged a pronunciation of the word pecan that is different from my own...
Polot wrote:
I mean extending/dragging out a word in music, especially at the end of a song/verse/chorus, to better match the melody is pretty common....

Indeed it is. I was pointing out that she mispronounces the word "on," and instead says "ond."
einsteinboricua wrote:
luckyone wrote:
Dion sings "My heart will go ond and onnnnn"

It sounds like this part is "onan onnnn"...if you've studied poetry (it's structure), poets took great liberties to unite syllables so that a line in a verse consisted of "x" syllables.

A haiku is a perfect example. If you were to use the word "brilliant", it can be pronounced as "brill-ee-ant" or "brill-yant". Depending on the pronunciation, it fits the haiku or it'll have a surplus/one less syllable.

In this case I'm willing to bet it's more likely just due to the fact that English is not Ms. Dion's native language. Many of her earliest English recordings were done completely phonetically, with her having little idea what she was saying. Perhaps coincidence, but she rarely performs many of those songs anymore.
 
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Wed Oct 25, 2017 5:30 pm

My dear 93yo mother has always pronounced "pornography" as "phonography" and "tarpaulin" as "tarpoleon" (rhyming with Napoleon), two hilarious mispronunciations I've never heard from anyone else. (She also uses "nucular", but that's all too common.)

With my cleft palate and other anomalies associated with my Treacher Collins syndrome, I've had people hilariously mishear some of what I say. Examples: when I say "embryo", one brother has actually misheard it as "elephant". And when I told one of my UCSF professors about my Baptist church I was attending there in San Francisco, he actually misheard it as "topless church"! That one still cracks both of us up. A dear older lady at that church (the very same "topless church") once misheard my complimentary description of her dress as "treadmill dress"; we cracked up over that one as well for years. Thus my speech can be hilariously difficult to understand.

I just remembered another word that is commonly pronounced two different ways: guillotine. I have heard it pronounced both "guil-lo-tine" and "gui-yo-tine" (the latter sounds more properly French). Which is correct?

SmithAir747
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bunumuring
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 1:20 am

Hey guys,
I've noticed here in Australia that more and more people, particularly young people, are saying 'everythink' instead of 'everything'....
And that SMS-derived text such as 'LOL' are becoming acceptable as written and spoken text. I'm guilty of that myself, lol!
Cheers
Bunumuring
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Braybuddy
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:08 am

Not a mispronunciation, but a word which seems to be increasingy used in the wrong context; "selfie". As in "Can you please take a selfie of me?" :lol:
 
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BartSimpson
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:59 am

To be honest - the english language per se is prone to not being spoken correctly.

Firstly, it's used as a mother language in many parts of the world so dialects just evolve naturally.

Secondly, even if we take the Oxford English Dictionary as the holy grail of the English Language how can you then get not confused when similar looking words are correctly pronounced differently? Just look at "tough", "though", "through", "thought". Four words with "ough" in the middle - but four different ways of pronounciation!
 
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einsteinboricua
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 2:31 pm

BartSimpson wrote:
Secondly, even if we take the Oxford English Dictionary as the holy grail of the English Language how can you then get not confused when similar looking words are correctly pronounced differently? Just look at "tough", "though", "through", "thought". Four words with "ough" in the middle - but four different ways of pronounciation!

That's a consequence of the language and not necessarily a regional dialect or mispronunciation. A word like "ask" for example is pretty straighforward and to say "aks" is not something I'd consider a regional thing.
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Tugger
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 3:37 pm

BartSimpson wrote:
To be honest - the english language per se is prone to not being spoken correctly.

One of the problems with any language is: How should a word be pronounced, what rules should apply? Should it be pronounced as it is in it's mother tongue, the language a word came from? Or should the spelling be changed to make it fit the English (or whatever) language? Or should it be pronounced under the rules of the language it is be used in?

With English, it has adopted so many words from every language that the rules aren't really able to be applied. To paraphrase Barbossa: The rules more suggestions than actual rules. ("The Code is more what you call guidelines, than actual rules.") So we have a mishmash. And the funny thing is if people do try to apply English rules to a foreign word they are often castigated and "harrumphed" by those that know the words origins and chastised to "pronounce it correctly."

So yes there are so many words just flat butchered and mispronounced all the time (and "aks" is among the worst, just lazy people - at first - who were not corrected and so it became accepted) but trying to force rules onto pronunciation is often a lost cause as well.

And I will note that I have seen a definite impact of voice to text systems right here on A.net. You can see that someone spoke something, the computer translated what it heard and the person, probably not knowing any better, posts it without correcting it.

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
 
KRIC777
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 6:43 pm

One that drives me nuts, and I hear people on the radio say It (a profession in which much of your job is, literally, to speak correctly) is the word "escape".
I hear it pronounced "ec-scape" a lot and I hate it. It is two syllables: es-cape (or e-scape), there is clearly no hard "c" or "k" sound before the "s" ..yet I hear "ec-scape" quite frequently. Aargh!
 
KRIC777
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 6:54 pm

Another I hear frequently is not so much a mis-pronunciation but a wholesale misuse of the word. "Averse" vs. "Adverse". Again, if I encounter this in casual conversation, I'm not going to correct somebody, because it's pretty obnoxious. I'm referring to when I hear professionals say it, such as TV or radio presenters...people who have ostensibly have some training in language and diction.
Example: "Joe wanted to go to the movies, but was not *adverse* to staying home and watching Netflix instead"
In that case, it should be "averse" not "adverse". Adverse refer to something harmful or undesired, averse refers to a strong disinclination toward something.
 
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SheikhDjibouti
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:46 pm

SmithAir747 wrote:
I just remembered another word that is commonly pronounced two different ways: guillotine. I have heard it pronounced both "guil-lo-tine" and "gui-yo-tine" (the latter sounds more properly French). Which is correct?
SmithAir747

Both are correct!
If you are referring to the office tool for cutting paper, and you are in an English speaking country, it is a guillotine (gill-o-teen)
If you are referring to the French instrument for beheading somebody, or a particularly large paper-cutter, you might affect a French accent and call it a guillotine (ghee-yo-teen).

As this is an aviation based forum.....
The capital of France is either Paris, or Paree.
The capital of England is either London or Londres (lawn-dre)
The capital of Denmark is either Copenhagen, or København.
The Russian capital, Москва́ is variously Musk-VA, Moss-co, or Moss-COW. The Russian and American versions both emphasize the second syllable, whilst the plain English version slurs both halves of the word seamlessly together, making the hyphen redundant. Personally I prefer the saying "I must go to Moscow", which if you listen closely, only really works one way.

And of course Basle or Basel, variously pronounced Baa-ll, or Bar-zull

But these are just the tip of the iceberg, and I'm not sure if any qualify as "mis-pronounciations"
There are two things that happen when you get old.
1. You start to lose your memory.
2. What was I saying again?
 
PhilBy
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Oct 27, 2017 3:35 pm

Aksking was common english usage in 18th/19th centuries in the less educated populations (rural and cockney) and is often seen in literature of the time next to dropped H's.
 
SmithAir747
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Oct 27, 2017 7:31 pm

SheikhDjibouti wrote:
SmithAir747 wrote:
I just remembered another word that is commonly pronounced two different ways: guillotine. I have heard it pronounced both "guil-lo-tine" and "gui-yo-tine" (the latter sounds more properly French). Which is correct?
SmithAir747

Both are correct!
If you are referring to the office tool for cutting paper, and you are in an English speaking country, it is a guillotine (gill-o-teen)
If you are referring to the French instrument for beheading somebody, or a particularly large paper-cutter, you might affect a French accent and call it a guillotine (ghee-yo-teen).


I'm referring to the original use of "guillotine"--the instrument of execution named after Dr. Guillotin around the time of the French Revolution. Paper-cutting devices (and industrial metal cutters) are just borrowing the name due to their similar action. Anyway, I've heard both pronunciations for the execution device.

SmithAir747
I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made... (Psalm 139:14)
 
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Braybuddy
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:44 pm

Another one that bugs me is the way some people pronounce "Peugeot" as "Per-jho". Where did THAT come from?
 
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SheikhDjibouti
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:02 pm

Braybuddy wrote:
Another one that bugs me is the way some people pronounce "Peugeot" as "Per-jho". Where did THAT come from?

Is that irony, sarcasm, or a genuine enquiry? I really can't tell, so I'll take it at face value.
Peugeot is French.
There are two things that happen when you get old.
1. You start to lose your memory.
2. What was I saying again?
 
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Tugger
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 3:56 am

SheikhDjibouti wrote:
Braybuddy wrote:
Another one that bugs me is the way some people pronounce "Peugeot" as "Per-jho". Where did THAT come from?

Is that irony, sarcasm, or a genuine enquiry? I really can't tell, so I'll take it at face value.
Peugeot is French.

Yes but:
British English:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7q-cnGYWDY

French:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrvIcYEhoAY

I've always known it as "Poo-zho". However if you were to follow the "rules" of English then it probably should pronounced "Pee-Eww-Ge-Ot" or maybe "Poo-got" ("Poo-Get"?)

So this again goes back to the real question of "What is the correct way to pronounce a word?" By the rules of its origin language or the rules of the language it is being used in? No matter which way you choose you will have a wide array of proper/appropriate pronunciations of words.

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
 
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N14AZ
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:25 am

There also seems to be something about the word „safety“:

In 2009 I worked with a colleague from Ukraine in a project in Armenia. He came to the office and said „we have to make that saffety report“. I asked „what kind of report?“ He: „you know this sa-ffety -report“.

Last year I spoke with a German lady and she pronounced safety in the same way. She is from East Germany, meaning she learned Russian in school. I wonder if that’s the reason why.

But just yesterday I talked to a guy from Ecuador. He also said „sa-ffety“.


My second issue is „cost“. When I was a junior engineer I was told be a well respected senior economist that the plural of cost is cost. I really respected this guy so I never used costs again. But over the years I realised that it’s useless since everybody else says costs. Recently I talked to him again and he told me that he gave up correcting people about the plural of cost.

And the best was a project assistant I had in Egypt in 2011. She always pronounced “the costs” like „zee costas“. Our financial expert in that project went crazy and started to welcome her in the morning by saying “ Good morning xxx (forgot the name)! How are zee costas today?” ;-)
 
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zckls04
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:42 am

Where I live there's a street called "Versailles" which is pronounced by most locals as "Ver-Sails". When I pronounce it "Vair-sye" people think I'm being pretentious.

My wife and I often bicker about it, so to annoy her I pronounce "Buena Vista" as "Byoona Vista", which is apparently what people used to call it in the 1950s.
Four Granavox Turbines!
 
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einsteinboricua
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:46 am

When I was in college, I took a job as a student helper. I took notes for students with disabilities. The only semester I worked on this, I helped a deaf girl in an English linguistics course. The professor would say "gone is a 'wenter'" a lot. It took a while for me to understand what he meant:

The verb "go" is irregular.
Present tense: go
Past tense: went
Past participle...it's supposed to be "have gone", yet lately people have been saying "have went".

And I have heard people say they "had went" to a place...so one day in class the professor explained the phrase and it all made sense: people don't use gone...so obviously, the word is now a "wenter".

And I've noticed that "go" is not the only verb to suffer from this:
Swim: swim, swam, swum, but people say I "had swam"
Speak: speak, spoke, spoken, but people say "had spoke"
Break: break, broke, broken, but people say "had broke"...and so on.
"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
 
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Braybuddy
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 8:30 am

SheikhDjibouti wrote:
Braybuddy wrote:
Another one that bugs me is the way some people pronounce "Peugeot" as "Per-jho". Where did THAT come from?

Is that irony, sarcasm, or a genuine enquiry? I really can't tell, so I'll take it at face value.
Peugeot is French.

But there is no "R" in the prononuciation of Peugeot in French. There will always be variations in the pronunciation of foreign words, but I can't understand why English speakers would insert a letter when there is none.
 
Vanguard
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 8:45 am

One particular annoyance for me, is when people (usually men for some reason) mispronounce the letter ‘H’. They say ‘haitch’ instead of ‘aitch’. I can see why - the pronounciation of letters often start with the letter itself, but think of W ... its pronounced ‘dubbelyew’ not ‘wubbleyou’!
 
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SheikhDjibouti
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Re: Mispronounced Words

Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:49 am

Tugger wrote:
So this again goes back to the real question of "What is the correct way to pronounce a word?" By the rules of its origin language or the rules of the language it is being used in? No matter which way you choose you will have a wide array of proper/appropriate pronunciations of words.

Tugg


Putting "rules" aside, the main purpose of language is communication.
Some people see that as principally them speaking, and everybody else listening, with the emphasis on them speaking (a.k.a. being fond of the sound of your own voice.)
I see communication as the need for the listener to be able to understand what is being said, and that can be aided by the transmitter accommodating the receiver.
If I am speaking to an English person, I say Paris (Pah-riss)
If I am speaking to a French person I say Paris (Pah-ree)
There is no right or wrong; it is up to me to adapt to circumstance.

Of course, if the receiver is just plain ignorant, and makes no effort themselves to meet society half-way, you can be excused for extracting the Michael.
In the case of the yoof of today, I find it difficult to give them much respeck, especially when they spend so much time on the inner-ne' (internet).
But if they meet me half-way, I shall endeavour to do the same, and learn to accept more of their mispronounciations.
There are two things that happen when you get old.
1. You start to lose your memory.
2. What was I saying again?

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