Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:02 pm

Turkey’s opponents in Congress seeking to block F-35 deal

A growing number of members of the U.S. Congress are speaking out against the sale of 100 fighter jets to Turkey, Greek newspaper Kathimerini said .

One example, it said, was Congressman David Cicilline, who “called for the deal to be scrapped in July last year in response to an incident when bodyguards of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan assaulted protesters during his official visit to Washington. The incident led to the blocking of the sale of semi-automatic weapons to Erdogan’s private guard.”

“The most active proponents against the deal are reportedly congressmen of Greek and Armenian heritage,” the newspaper added.

U.S. Air Force Deputy Undersecretary Heidi Grant had also expressed concern over the deal, Kathimerini said.

“It’s a significant concern, not only to the United States, because we need to protect this high-end technology, fifth-generation technology, but for all of our partners and allies that have already purchased the F-35,” it quoted her as saying in November.

The first F-35s are due to be delivered this year, while the remainder will be delivered by 2022, the newspaper said.

https://ahvalnews.com/us-turkey/turkeys ... -newspaper
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:04 pm

Greek and Armenian Americans Press U.S. Senators to Block F-35 Sale to Turkey

The Hellenic American Leadership Council (HALC) and the Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA) have launched a national advocacy campaign encouraging U.S. Senators to block a planned sale of U.S. F-35 stealth fighters to Turkey’s increasingly erratic and anti-American Erdogan regime.

This joint Hellenic-Armenian American initiative – the most recent in a series of ANCA-HALC advocacy campaigns – warns Senators against the dangers of providing Erdogan with advanced weapons that he may turn against our allies – including Greece, Cyprus, Israel, and Armenia – and, possibly even U.S. forces. The campaign also raises alarms regarding the likelihood that Turkey may leak highly classified F-35 technology to adversaries, including Iran and Russia.

http://asbarez.com/170358/greek-and-arm ... to-turkey/
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:06 pm

THE QUEEN OPENS THE F-35 FACILITY AT RAF MARHAM

The Queen visited RAF Marham in early February to open officially the F-35 facility at the base.

According to an ITV report dated February 2, 2018:

The Queen has taken a tour of RAF Marham in Norfolk to see how it is preparing for the arrival of its new fighter jets.

Children from nearby schools lined the roads leading to the camp gates, waving flags as her car arrived at the base.

AF Marham, which has been the home of the Tornado GR4 Force, will welcome the F-35 Lightning Force next summer.

While there, the Queen officially opened the new Lightning Operations Centre.

It is the first building completed as part of a development scheme building the infrastructure needed to support the new jets.

http://www.sldinfo.com/the-queen-opens- ... af-marham/
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:10 pm

San Diego welcomes a week of wonder weapons

He was standing in the middle of San Diego’s convention center, but Stormy Boudreaux was helping a Marine aviator skirt an enemy surface-to-air battery hidden in the Middle Eastern desert before gently locking onto two jets more than 40 miles away, closing behind their afterburners at supersonic speed, hunting them unseen on any radars.

Two missiles glimmered across the cockpit screen. One plane disappeared. Then the other, the way a retired Air Force pilot like Boudreaux expects from the stealthy F-35A Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter, the most advanced jet of its kind every built.

In a hall filled with the latest wonder weapons dreamed up by the globe’s biggest arms merchants, Lockheed Martin’s $1.3 million flying simulator might have taken the prize for the most popular stop. Stripped of many of its top secret cockpit components, it’s the same digital display used by pilots at Arizona’s Luke Air Force Base.

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/mil ... story.html
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:42 pm

Australian industry reaches F-35 milestone

Australian industry has now been awarded more than AUD1 billion (USD786 million) in subcontracting work on the Lockheed Martin F-35 fighter aircraft programme and the government said it is planning to secure more.

Australia’s Minister for Defence Industry Christopher Pyne announced the milestone on 13 February. “More than 50 Australian companies directly shared in the production contracts to date, with many more indirectly benefiting through supply chain work,” he said, adding that Australia is aiming for F-35 work worth more than USD2 billion by 2023.

“Further opportunities are expected for Australian companies to increase production contract values over the next four years as F-35 production rates more than double,” he said.

http://www.janes.com/article/77847/aust ... -milestone
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:43 pm

$10.7B set aside in U.S. budget to buy dozens of Lockheed Martin's F-35 aircraft

The U.S. Department of Defense plans to ask Congress for 77 F-35 aircraft made by aerospace giant Lockheed Martin Corp. (NYSE: LMT), the DoD said Monday.

The order, part of the $686 billion President Trump allocated to the DoD in his fiscal year 2019 budget request, comes with a price tag of $10.7 billion, the highest for any product the DoD wants to purchase. Other military equipment included in the budget request are submarines, helicopters and destroyers.

The order is largely in line with expectations. The administration of former President Barack Obama had projected 80 F-35 aircraft for the 2019 fiscal year, according to Bloomberg.

"We’re encouraged to see strong support for Lockheed Martin programs and a meaningful increase in defense spending, which backs investment in the capabilities our men and women in uniform require to address today’s dynamic global security environment," the company said in a prepared statement.

The F-35 is primarily manufactured in Fort Worth, where Lockheed Martin employs approximately 14,500 people. To see a history of the Fort Worth plant, check out the slideshow below.

https://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news ... udget.html
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:43 pm

Syrian downing of F-16I begs question: Why didn’t Israel deploy F-35s?

As the Israeli Air Force continues to investigate the Feb. 10 loss of an F-16I to Syrian anti-aircraft fire, experts here are privately questioning why, given the operational circumstances that denied Israel the element of strategic surprise, it did not opt to deploy its newest front-line fighter: the stealthy F-35I.

In early December, the Air Force declared initial operational capability of the nine F-35s now in its possession. And from the aerial activity reported by residents near its home base at Nevatim, southern Israel, the aircraft are accruing significant flight time.

Yet none of the operational F-35s were part of the eight-aircraft force package tasked with destroying an Iranian command center in central Syria. The command center was reportedly operating the unmanned Shahed 171 drone that Israel says penetrated its airspace in the early morning of Feb. 10.

Nor were they tasked to lead the follow-on wave of strikes on 12 separate Syrian and Iranian assets in the punitive operation launched later that day in response to the F-16I downing.

But why not?

Perhaps these costly stealth fighters are too precious to use. Or perhaps the Israeli Air Force is not sufficiently confident in the aircraft or its pilots’ proficiency in operating the fifth-generation fighter.

Given pledges by Syria and its Hezbollah allies of “more surprises” should Israel venture additional attacks on Syrian soil, will the Israel Air Force opt to use these front-line assets next time around?

The official answer to all these questions, according to Israel Defense Forces spokesman Lt. Col. Jonathan Conricus, is: “No comment.”

https://www.defensenews.com/global/mide ... loy-f-35s/
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:50 pm

Very strong wording coming out of Japan now on the probable acquisition of the F-35B STOVL for use to deployed locations, on the Izumo and as a replacement for some of the F-15 fleet.

F-35B jets eyed to defend remote isles / Fighters also mulled for MSDF’s Izumo ship

The government is considering operating F-35B fighter jets from about fiscal 2026, in an effort to utilize airports on remote islands and thereby improve the nation’s capability to defend the isles, The Yomiuri Shimbun has learned.

Considered the most advanced stealth fighters, F-35Bs are currently operated by the U.S. military based in Japan.

The Japanese government is also eyeing the operation of the fighters on Izumo, the Maritime Self-Defense Force’s largest-class destroyer and which Tokyo is considering remodeling into an aircraft carrier, according to government sources.

The government has decided to introduce 42 F-35A fighter jets — which are capable of taking off and landing on ordinary runways — as a successor to aging F-4 fighters. The first F-35A was deployed at the Air Self-Defense Force’s Misawa Air Base in Aomori Prefecture last month.

As for the F-35B, the government is planning to indicate the number of aircraft to be procured in the next Medium Term Defense Program, which is to be compiled at the end of this year. It is also mulling including related expenses in the fiscal 2019 budget plan, with a view to starting the delivery of F-35Bs from around fiscal 2024, the sources said.

The F-35B is likely to be defined as a successor to the F-15, the ASDF’s main fighter jet. One plan is to introduce about 20 to 40 F-35Bs, which would correspond to one to two squadrons. Tokyo is also considering increasing the number of F-35As in the next midterm defense program, according to the sources.

The introduction of F-35Bs would facilitate the use of commercial airports on remote islands.

The minimum runway length required for the advanced fighter to take off is relatively short, making it more likely to be able to actually take off even when the airstrip at its home base is under attack.

The government is considering highlighting the objective of strengthening the capability for continuous combat operations in the National Defense Program Guidelines, which is expected to be reviewed at the year end. The ASDF’s Nyutabaru Air Base in Shintomi, Miyazaki Prefecture, is named as a possible base for the F-35B to be deployed.

The government is also eyeing converting Izumo into an aircraft carrier — which fighter jets can take off from and land on — by reinforcing the heat resistance of the ship’s deck. It aims to begin operation of the aircraft carrier in the early 2020s.

Starting this fiscal year, the MSDF has commissioned a shipbuilding company to carry out a study on enhancing the Izumo’s aircraft operation capability.

Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera suggested at a meeting of the House of Representatives Budget Committee on Thursday that the government is considering operating the F-35B. The study on Izumo is being carried out “with the recently developed aircraft in mind,” the minister said.

The converted Izumo is planned to be utilized for such purposes as a supply base to defend remote islands. For the time being, the government wants the U.S. military to operate the F-35B, but it also plans to eventually operate the advanced fighter on its own by learning operational know-how from the U.S. side regarding the takeoff and landing of fighter jets, according to the sources.

There are 201 F-15 fighter jets — which were first introduced in fiscal 1980 — currently being deployed. Of them, 102 will continue to be enhanced and used in the future by installing them with such equipment as new types of electronic devices. The remaining 99, without being enhanced, are expected to be replaced with F-35Bs as well as a successor fighter to the F-2, the sources said.

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0004240516
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:41 pm

Capability jump: IAF looks to buy fifth-generation F-35 fighter

In what would be a huge capability jump, the Indian Air Force (IAF) is increasingly interested in procuring the American F-35 Lightning II for its depleting fighter fleet.
Business Standard learns the IAF top brass is formally requesting for a classified briefing by the F-35’s prime builder, Lockheed Martin, on the capabilities of the sophisticated, fifth-generation fighter developed under the US Joint Strike Fighter programme.
The US government has not formally offered the F-35 to India. A classified briefing would require formal clearance from the US Department of Defence (the Pentagon) and the State Department. The grant of such a clearance would be an important first step towards permitting the sale of F-35s to India.
It is learnt the IAF wants to procure 126 of the variant called F-35A – the air force version of the fighter that incorporates “conventional take-off and landing”, or CTOL. Another variant, the F-35B, incorporating “short take-off and vertical landing”, or (STOVL), has been developed for the US Marine Corps. A third version, developed for the US Navy, incorporates “catapult assisted take-off but arrested recovery (CATOBAR).
The Indian Navy, which has never ruled out operating the F-35 off Indian aircraft carriers, has received a briefing on the F-35 as far back as 2010, Lockheed Martin official Orville Prins told this correspondent. However, at that stage, the F-35 was still grappling with serious development challenges.
The F-35’s affordability is also attractive for New Delhi. In contrast to the bare-bones price of $115 million for each Rafale fighter (with India-specific enhancements, spares, logistics and weapons all extra), the F-35A cost customers $94.6 million last February. Lockheed Martin says it will reduce the cost to $80 million by 2020.
A fifth-generation fighter is characterised by a “stealth design”, making it far more difficult for radar to detect; “supercruise”, or the ability to fly at supersonic speeds without engaging engine afterburners; and highly networked avionics that detect and engage enemy aircraft using a range of sensors and weapons across the battle-space.
The only true fifth-generation fighters in service are the US Air Force’s F-22 Raptor and the F-35 Lightning II. China is developing two stealth fighters – the J-20 Chengdu and the J-31 Shenyang. Russia is developing its own fifth-generation fighter, the PAK-FA, and has offered India a partnership role in developing the PAK-FA into the eponymous Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA) for the IAF. Negotiations on roles and costing are over, but the Indian defence ministry is yet to accept.
The United Progressive Alliance (UPA) defence minister, AK Antony, had ruled out buying the F-35, stating that India would meet its short-term requirement of fifth-generation fighters with the FGFA.

For the IAF’s long term needs, the Defence R&D Organisation is developing the Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA).
Sources close to the Pentagon say India would not be sold the F-35 as long as it is partnering Russia in the FGFA co-development project. That is because Washington would guard against the leakage of F-35 technology into the FGFA.
Senior officers say the IAF is not enthused about the FGFA project. They point out the F-35 is further advanced in development and has already entered service with the USAF and six-seven air forces of American allies.
For Lockheed Martin, an Indian request for the F-35 would create a dilemma. The US company would rather have the IAF buy the F-16 Block 70, which it has offered to build in India in partnership with Tata Advanced Systems Ltd (TASL).
For Lockheed Martin, that would keep alive the F-16 assembly line, which has long functioned from Fort Worth, Texas, and has now moved temporarily to Greenville, South Carolina, where it is building a $2.8 billion order from Bahrain for 19 F-16V fighters.
The Fort Worth facility has been made over to building the F-35, of which over 3,000 are already on order.
Meanwhile, the assembly line in India would build new F-16s for the IAF, as well as for orders that Lockheed Martin expects from southeast Asian and central European countries. It would also provide overhaul and upgrade facilities for the estimated 3,000 F-16 fighters in service worldwide, in some 25 air forces.
As this newspaper reported (December 16, “Lockheed Martin says F-16 orders flowing in”) Lockheed Martin calculates that an Indian line would benefit, in the medium term, from new fighter orders worth $16 billion, and $6.5 billion in upgrading old F-16s.
Simultaneously, American jobs would get a lease of life, as F-16 suppliers in the US would continue feeding into the integration line in India. At least 50 per cent of the F-16 by value would continue to be made in America.
For all these reasons, Lockheed Martin is painting the F-16 Block 70 sale to the IAF as a stepping stone to eventually obtaining the F-35.
While the US has supplied the F-35 only to close allies, Washington insiders say India’s recent designation as a Major Defence Partner (MDP), and a groundswell of goodwill towards New Delhi, make conditions propitious for an Indian request. An indicator is the recent permission granted for the sale to India of the Sea Guardian unmanned aerial vehicle – so far sold only to close allies.
In 2011, the influential US Senate Armed Services Committee requested the Pentagon to study the feasibility of an F-35 sale to India. Senators John Cornyn (co-chair of the Senate India Caucus) and Joseph Lieberman spearheaded the proposal.
But US officials in Washington also complain about fatigue at New Delhi’s tardiness in following up discussions with formal requests. The mood in the Pentagon, say these officials, is: “Let New Delhi ask for the F-35. Then we’ll take things forward.”
The defence ministry and the IAF have not responded to an emailed request for comments.

http://www.business-standard.com/articl ... 246_1.html
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Fri Feb 16, 2018 1:31 am

Upgrade Navy Networks To Get Most From F-35: Commandant Wants Quality

If the Commandant of the Marine Corps had one more dollar to spend — and he probably will with the recent budget deal — he’d use it to upgrade Navy ships’ electronics to take full advantage of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, he said this morning. The Marines’ new F-35Bs have the sensors to gather vast amounts of data and the computer smarts to “fuse” and make sense of it, experts tell us, but the Navy amphibious warships it will fly from lack the networks and computing to download and use all that intelligence.

“Right now we’re not even close to having that discussion with some of our amphibs, particularly the big deck amphibs,” Neller said. (That’s the LHA and LHD classes, often referred to as mini aircraft carriers). “We’re putting a fifth gen airplane on that amphib and we’re running a less than fifth gen command and control suite. And so to me that would be the first thing.”

It’s worth noting that Gen. Robert Neller was speaking off the cuff after I asked him about his priorities at an event hosted by the Amphibious Warship Industrial Base Coalition. As it was, Neller thought aloud for a moment about various Marine Corps needs, from long-range firepower to more Navy attack submarines to clear the seas, before saying his top priority would be command, control, and networking upgrades to fully exploit the capabilities of the F-35. Nevertheless, this morning’s remarks give a pretty good preview of what the Marines will be telling Congress.

“We don’t have to have just… more ships, we’ve got to have more capable ships,” Neller said in his opening remarks. In particular, he went on, “the F-35 is a very capable airplane, but it’s got to be able to network. It will not realize its capability unless you can network that thing. You’ve got to exchange information not just between other airplanes, but (with) the ships that are in the fleet and….the force that’s going to go ashore.”

https://breakingdefense.com/2018/02/upg ... s-quality/

This is a recurring theme amongst F-35 operators, that the aircraft has the ability to feed so much additional data into the command and situational picture but that current systems are not capable of handling it. Perhaps a hidden cost of acquiring F-35 if you want to use it to the full ability but also an advantage to provide a significant situational awareness improvement to a deployed force.
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Fri Feb 16, 2018 1:38 am

Battlefield Airmen integrate with F-35, improve air ground dominance

During the F-35 Lightning II’s pre-Initial Operational Test and Evaluation, Airmen from the 3rd Air Support Operations Squadron had the opportunity to work with all three variants of the Joint Strike Fighter.

Tactical Air Control Party Airmen coordinate air support with joint and international platforms, making this a unique opportunity to work with three different versions of the fifth-generation aircraft.

“We were able to execute close-air-support training scenarios and validate TACP cold-weather training,” said Staff Sgt. Gary Russell, Detachment 1, 3rd ASOS battalion air liaison officer. “We were also able to build the 3rd ASOS’s familiarization with all F-35 variants.”

Unlike other aircraft used for CAS, the F-35 utilizes speed and stealth technology to become a more lethal threat on the battlefield.

“It’s a little more difficult to control than some other aircraft,” said Russell. “It flies higher and faster than most aircraft we deal with, but it also gives us the advantage of not having to worry about as many surface-to-air threats. Because of that, we are able to focus more on the ground commander’s priorities.”

http://www.eielson.af.mil/News/Article- ... dominance/

Some interswting observations on CAS with the F-35. Higher and faster compared to what they are used to could be referencing F-16s or A-10s? Conversely it must be a lot easier to call in CAS when you don’t have to worry about the Surface to Air threat.
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:09 am

F-35 takes flak, but still flying high

The U.S. military is all in on the F-35 joint strike fighter, the most expensive weapons program in Pentagon history, with plans to buy more than 2,400 over the next quarter-century.

In the fiscal 2019 defense budget request released this month, the Pentagon is requesting $10.7 billion to buy 77 planes next year, on top of the 70 ordered this year, and 74 last year.

The original concept behind the high-tech fifth-generation multi-role fighter was to save money by having a common airframe with custom features for each service, a tail hook for the Navy, a vertical takeoff model for the Marines, and a runway takeoff model for the Air Force.

And sales to U.S. allies were going to keep the price down.

But since its inception in the late 1990s, the price tag for the stealthy plane has skyrocketed from a vastly over-optimistic estimate of $40 million a copy, to more than $100 million, with projected costs topping $1 trillion to keep the aircraft flying over its projected 60-year lifespan.

The plane the U.S. is banking on as the “future of tactical aviation” has taken unrelenting flak from critics over the years even as it has yet to see combat.

A Google search for “F-35” and “boondoggle,” turns up 65,000 hits with headlines such as, “What went wrong with the F-35,” (Scientific American) and “Military Admits Billion-Dollar War Toy F-35 Is F**ked,” (Daily Beast).

But the $400 billion program keeps chugging along, seemingly evading potshots from its many critics as easily as enemy radar.

“The F-35 is a remarkably successful program. It has met all of its requirement for stealth and provides superior situational awareness,” said Loren Thompson, chief operating officer of the nonprofit Lexington Institute, a Washington think tank that receives some of its funding from Lockheed Martin, builder of the F-35.

Thompson says he’s been following the program since Lockheed got the contract in October 2001.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/f-35- ... le/2649230

More details at the link as well as some comparative analysis from POGO. Given I'm a believer I find the POGO comments inaccurate and deliberately misleading...
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:12 am

An interesting perspective on the rationale for Germany to acquire the F-35.

The F-35 for Germany

Within a decade, Germany must replace 85 of its Tornado multi-role combat aircraft. Designed and built in the 1970s by a consortium of British, Italian and West German aircraft companies, the Jets have reached a point of diminishing return when it comes to maintenance and modernization. In 2015, for example, it was reported by the German press that only 30 of the planes were combat-ready at any given time. Plain and simple, the Luftwaffe needs a new aircraft.

In May of last year, the German air force asked to be briefed on the American-made F-35, the stealthy, multi-mission, 5th-generation aircraft. Then, in November, Lt. General Karl Müllner, the Luftwaffe chief of staff, indicated his service’s preference for replacing the Tornado jets with the F-35 because of its low-observable signature and its ability to identify and strike distant targets. “I think I have expressed myself clearly enough as to what the favorite of the air force is.” Given Russian advances in ground-based air defenses and combat aircraft, the general’s comments were not surprising from a military point of view.

But the general’s remarks may well have been a surprise to his government. In December, the Deputy Defense Minister Ralf Brauksiepe pushed back against the idea of replacing the Tornados with F-35s by simply noting that this was “not the position of the federal government.” Instead, the ministry stated that the Tornados would be replaced with the Eurofighter, an aircraft originally designed in the late 1980s and early 1990s to be an air-superiority fighter but which has evolved into a multi-mission platform. Like the Tornado, the Eurofighter is built by a consortium (Germany, Italy, UK and Spain) of European nations.

Not that the Eurofighter is a second-rate plane. It can climb at a high rate, it’s maneuverable, and it has a maximum speed of well over Mach 2. In each of those categories, it is superior to the F-35, more comparable to the U.S. Air Force’s F-15. But that’s the rub, it was designed principally for late Cold War aerial combat—dogfighting. Despite upgrades to the Eurofighter, the Russians have modernized their fighters as well, with the Su-35 being perhaps the top non-stealthy, air-superiority aircraft in the world today. Add in Russia’s advanced integrated air defenses, and you are asking a Luftwaffe pilot to bring a knife, albeit a very capable knife, to a gunfight.

There is a reason other European allies—the Brits, the Danes, the Italians, the Dutch and the Norwegians—have opted for the 5th-generation jet over 4th-generation alternatives. In 2016, the Danish government ran a competition between the F-35 and possible alternatives, including the Eurofighter. The conclusion: “Under survivability and mission effectiveness, the Joint Strike Fighter comes out better than the two other candidates. This is due to a number of factors, including for example the low radar signature of the aircraft as well as the application of advanced systems and sensors that enhance the pilot’s tactical overview and ensure the survival of the aircraft and efficient mission performance.”

Neither plane is cheap. But as aviation industry authority Richard Aboulafia has noted, the Eurofighter “had the costs of an F-35 without the modern features.”

So why the preference for the Eurofighter by the German government? The first and most obvious reason is that, unless there are new orders, the Eurofighter production line in Germany will be forced to close and, with closure, well-paying jobs and expertise will be lost. However, so goes the defense aircraft industry, as American lines for the F-16 and F-18 also face this prospect.

Equally important to Berlin, however, is the July 2017 announcement that Germany and France had agreed to work together on the design and production of a new, presumably 5th-generation, fighter jet that would replace the Eurofighter and France’s Rafales. Given the emphasis both capitals are now putting on greater defense cooperation within the European Union, it’s no surprise that Berlin fears that buying F-35s now might lessen the necessity of developing a new Franco-German aircraft.

However, procuring a limited number of F-35s in the immediate years ahead does not, strictly speaking, preclude France and Germany moving forward with their own development program. Moreover, given the lengthy timelines typically involved between an agreement to begin work and a plane actually entering service, it could be argued that what Germany and France should be working on is less an aircraft comparable to the F-35 than a plane that is a step up—perhaps even an unmanned stealth fighter.

It is not unreasonable for sovereign states to worry about the health of their defense industrial base. And it is certainly a lot harder these days for German ministers to argue for “buying American” given the unpopularity of President Trump and his needless broadsides that allies, like Germany, “owe” the U.S. billions. Yet the fact remains that the German government also owes its forces the kinds of capabilities that maximize their safety and effectiveness in a potential conflict that could take place well before a new Franco-German fighter is available. The men and women of the Luftwaffe are right to want the F-35.

https://www.aei.org/publication/the-f-35-for-germany/
 
Ozair
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 20, 2018 8:21 pm

Successful F-35 drag chute test in Norway

While The US Air Force is completing another round of cold-weather testing of the F-35A at Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska, Norway completed a successful verification of the drag chute system at Ørland Air Force Base in Norway February 16th.

Receiving the first three aircraft in November 2017 was a major milestone for Norway. The program delivers on all key criteria: Time, cost and performance. Through the verification of the production version of the drag chute on our production model of the F-35, the weapons system is expected to fully qualify for arctic conditions this spring, says Major General Morten Klever, Program Director for the F-35 program in Norway's Ministry of Defence.

The chute — unique to the Norwegian aircraft — is housed under a small fairing on the upper rear fuselage between the vertical tails. It is being added in order to rapidly decelerate Royal Norwegian Air Force F-35s after landing on the country’s icy runways when there are challenging wind conditions. Other country’s may adopt the system.

https://www.regjeringen.no/en/aktuelt/h ... id2590220/

I'm not aware of any other nations considering the drag chute, even the US who will be operating F-35 in Alaska but perhaps if Canada selects the F-35 they will acquire it.

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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:11 pm

Ozair wrote:
Successful F-35 drag chute test in Norway

While The US Air Force is completing another round of cold-weather testing of the F-35A at Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska, Norway completed a successful verification of the drag chute system at Ørland Air Force Base in Norway February 16th.

Receiving the first three aircraft in November 2017 was a major milestone for Norway. The program delivers on all key criteria: Time, cost and performance. Through the verification of the production version of the drag chute on our production model of the F-35, the weapons system is expected to fully qualify for arctic conditions this spring, says Major General Morten Klever, Program Director for the F-35 program in Norway's Ministry of Defence.

The chute — unique to the Norwegian aircraft — is housed under a small fairing on the upper rear fuselage between the vertical tails. It is being added in order to rapidly decelerate Royal Norwegian Air Force F-35s after landing on the country’s icy runways when there are challenging wind conditions. Other country’s may adopt the system.

https://www.regjeringen.no/en/aktuelt/h ... id2590220/

I'm not aware of any other nations considering the drag chute, even the US who will be operating F-35 in Alaska but perhaps if Canada selects the F-35 they will acquire it.

Image


I think the Netherlands
 
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:18 pm

Mortyman wrote:

I think the Netherlands

From what I can tell the Netherlands provided funding to Norway to develop the chute but has yet to commit to acquire it.
Last December, the Netherlands announced the Dutch government would pay Norway NOK96 million ($11.4 million) to develop the F-35’s brake chute.
The Netherlands’ cost share would allow Norwegian government to redirect those funds to cover general expenses related to the Norwegian acquisition of the F-35, FlightGlobal reported.
The Netherlands has only committed to preparing aircraft for the drag chute mounting and the initial contribution covers the development of the modification.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ys-443659/
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
Posts: 437
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Re: F-35 news thread

Tue Feb 20, 2018 10:15 pm

With the SRVL stuff being done by the UK I do wonder if some of the chute users would instead consider the B version. Similar idea in that both provide for shorter landing rolls.
 
Planeflyer
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Re: F-35 news thread

Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:36 am

Why exactly does Norway need this capability? Weather?
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: F-35 news thread

Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:18 am

Planeflyer wrote:
Why exactly does Norway need this capability? Weather?


Icy runways. You know, as they're up in the Arctic circle area. ;)

The drogue chute will help augment the brakes on any slippery runways they have to use. I believe the Norwegians also do the practice of having major roads built to be wartime runways if needed. So they just can't make them super long and straight like a regular runway. Which means you want something to help the brakes.
 
Ozair
Topic Author
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Re: F-35 news thread

Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:08 am

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
With the SRVL stuff being done by the UK I do wonder if some of the chute users would instead consider the B version. Similar idea in that both provide for shorter landing rolls.

The Bee comes with a shorter mission radius (500nm vs 660nm for the A) and reduced internal payload so I think most operators won't be willing to sacrifice that when the alternative, at least in Norway's case, can land on shorter runways with the drag chute.
 
Ozair
Topic Author
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Re: F-35 news thread

Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:13 am

Additional information is emerging about Japan topping up their F-35 order with another 20-25 jets in the next 6 years.

Exclusive: Japan to buy at least 20 more F-35A stealth fighters - sources

Japan plans to buy at least 20 additional F-35A stealth fighters over the next six years, some or all of which it may purchase directly from Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) in the United States rather than assemble locally, three sources said.

“In view of budgets and production schedules a new acquisition of around 25 planes is appropriate,” said one of the sources with knowledge of the plan. The sources asked not to be identified because they are not authorized to speak to the media.

The sources said buying complete aircraft from the United States, at about $100 million each, will save Japan about $30 million per airframe.

The purchase will add to an earlier order for 42 of the fighters, most of which are being constructed at a “final assembly and check out” plant in Japan operated by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (7011.T), the country’s leading defense contractor.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-japa ... SKCN1G507W

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